Illegal Downloading Essays and Research Papers

Instructions for Illegal Downloading College Essay Examples

Title: P2P and the E Music Industry

  • Total Pages: 15
  • Words: 4372
  • Works Cited:25
  • Citation Style: APA
  • Document Type: Essay
Essay Instructions: Objective

This proposal term paper focuses on the impact that the development of the peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing model has had on the commercial e-music industry. Firstly, an overview of e-business and the evolution of the Internet are presented. This is followed by a short discussion and classification of business to business (B2B), business to consumer (B2C) and peer-to-peer (P2P) market types. The marketing mix elements of price, product, promotion and place for digital content e-music businesses are then explored. Customer value, implications for the value chain and related ethics are then considered. Finally recommendations will be presented. This report is based on a survey of recent literature and text books on the topic of P2P networks and the e-music industry.
Title

The title of this proposal term paper is “P2P and the E-Music Industry”

Summary of proposal

Plain and simple: piracy is bad news. While the term is commonly used, “piracy” doesn’t even begin to describe what is taking place. When you go online and download songs without permission, you are stealing. The illegal downloading of music is just as wrong as shoplifting from a local convenience store – and the impact on those who create music and bring it to fans is equally devastating. For every artist you can name at the top of the Billboard music charts, there is a long line of songwriters, sound engineers, and label employees who help create those hits. They all feel the pain of music theft. The law is quite clear here, and frankly, legal downloading is easy and doesn’t cost much. Record companies have licensed hundreds of digital partners offering download and subscription services, cable and satellite radio services, Internet radio webcasting, legitimate peer-to-peer (P2P) services, video-on-demand, podcasts, CD kiosks and digital jukeboxes, mobile products such as ring backs, ringtones, wallpapers, audio and video downloads and more.

Description of problem
There are two categories to consider here: losses from street piracy – the manufacture and sale of counterfeit CDs – and losses from online piracy. One credible analysis by the Institute for Policy Innovation concludes that global music piracy causes $12.5 billion of economic losses every year, 71,060 U.S. jobs lost, a loss of $2.7 billion in workers' earnings, and a loss of $422 million in tax revenues, $291 million in personal income tax and $131 million in lost corporate income and production taxes. As you can imagine, calculating loses for online piracy is a difficult task. We do know that the pirate marketplace currently far dwarfs the legal marketplace, and when that happens, that means investment in new music is compromised.

All the same, it’s important to note that across the board, piracy is a very real threat to the livelihoods of not only artists and record label employees but also thousands of less celebrated people in the music industry from sound engineers and technicians to warehouse workers and record store clerks. Piracy undermines the future of music by depriving the industry of the resources it needs to find and develop new talent and drains millions of dollars in tax revenue from local communities and their residents.


Proposed analysis

The ultimate goal with all our anti-piracy efforts is to protect the ability of the recording industry to invest in new bands and new music and to give legal online services a chance to flourish. That’s why we educate. That’s why record companies license music to legal services. And that’s why, when necessary, we enforce our rights through the legal system.

Just as we must hold accountable the businesses that encourage theft online, individuals who engage in illegal downloading must also know there are consequences to their actions. If you violate the law and steal from record companies, musicians, songwriters and everyone else involved in making music, you can be held accountable. With so many great legal music options available, there is really no excuse for music theft. Fans have a choice: pay a little now or a lot more lately.
End product (do you intend to develop a new framework, model, or provide lessons learned)

The Internet and developments in e-commerce technology has made it possible to capture and share large amounts of information in real time, this has enabled greater collaboration and integration between supply chain partners. Almost all businesses have or an in the process of adopting some type of e-commerce technology to streamline their SCM activities. The Internet has now surpassed EDI technology with greater flexibility and relatively low costs. The direct impact of e-commerce technologies on supply chain performance is not clear, and supply chain executives should not expect to justify IT investment based on immediate performance results. In order to receive strategic benefits, process re-design must be incorporated into the implementation of IT.
Proposed organizational setting

The RIAA is an organization committed to helping the music business thrive. Our goal is to foster a business and legal climate that protects the ability of our members – the record companies that create, manufacture and/or distribute some 90 percent of all legitimate sound recordings produced and sold in the United States to invest in the next generation of music.

Name of the organization

Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA)

Industry

The RIAA works to protect intellectual property rights worldwide and the First Amendment rights of artists; conducts consumer, industry and technical research; and monitors and reviews state and federal laws, regulations and policies.

Brief background information
The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) is the trade group that represents the U.S. recording industry. Its mission is to foster a business and legal climate that supports and promotes our members' creative and financial vitality. Its members are the record companies that comprise the most vibrant national music industry in the world. RIAA members create, manufacture and/or distribute approximately 90% of all legitimate sound recordings produced and sold in the United States. In support of this mission, the RIAA works to protect intellectual property rights worldwide and the First Amendment rights of artists; conducts consumer, industry and technical research; and monitors and reviews state and federal laws, regulations and policies.
Brief description of project of interest

The ultimate goal with all our anti-piracy efforts is to protect the ability of the recording industry to invest in new bands and new music and to give legal online services a chance to flourish. That’s why we educate. That’s why record companies license music to legal services. And that’s why, when necessary, we enforce our rights through the legal system. Just as we must hold accountable the businesses that encourage theft online, individuals who engage in illegal downloading must also know there are consequences to their actions. If you violate the law and steal from record companies, musicians, songwriters and everyone else involved in making music, you can be held accountable. With so many great legal music options available, there is really no excuse for music theft. Fans have a choice: pay a little now or a lot more lately.
The Internet and developments in e-commerce technology has made it possible to capture and share large amounts of information in real time, this has enabled greater collaboration and integration between supply chain partners. Almost all businesses have or an in the process of adopting some type of e-commerce technology to streamline their SCM activities. The Internet has now surpassed EDI technology with greater flexibility and relatively low costs.
The direct impact of e-commerce technologies on supply chain performance is not clear, and supply chain executives should not expect to justify IT investment based on immediate performance results. In order to receive strategic benefits, process re-design must be incorporated into the implementation of IT.
Status of access to organization

In support of this mission, we work to protect intellectual property rights worldwide and the First Amendment rights of artists; conduct consumer, industry and technical research; and monitor and review state and federal laws, regulations and policies.
Point of contact within organization

The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) is located at 1025 F ST N.W., 10th Floor, Washington, D.C. 20004. You can also contact RIAA at (202) 775-0101.
Outline of term paper
I. Introduction
II. E-Business and the Internet
III. Types of markets
a. Business-to-Business (B2B)
b. Business-to-Consumer (B2C)
c. Peer-to-Peer (P2P)
IV. The Marketing Mix
a. Price
b. Product
c. Promotion
d. Place
V. Customer value and the value chain
a. Customer value
b. Value chain implications
VI. Ethics
VII. Conclusion
VIII. Recommendations

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References

Abram, J., & Hawkes, P. (2003). The Seven Myths of Customer Management: How to Be Customer-Driven without Being Customer-Led. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

Benkler, Y. (2004). Sharing Nicely: On Shareable Goods and the Emergence of Sharing as a Modality of Economic Production. Yale Law Journal, 114(2), 273.

Brown, C.M., Carbon, H.B., Brown, T., Donaldson, S.A., Holmes, T.E., Hughes, a., et al. (2007, December). Hotlist 07: These Bold Innovators-All under the Age of 40-Are Shaping Our World. Black Enterprise, 38, 120.

Catalano, P. (2003, January). The New World of the Microlabel. World and I, 18, 98.

Cooper, T.W. (1998). New Technology Effects Inventory: Forty Leading Ethical Issues. Journal of Mass Media Ethics, 13(2), 71-92.

Dennis, C., Fenech, T., & Merrilees, B. (2004). E-Retailing. New York: Routledge.

Gervais, D.J. (2001). Transmissions of Music on the Internet: An Analysis of the Copyright Laws of Canada, France, Germany, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law, 34(5), 1363.

Gillespie, T. (2001, Summer). WWW.P2p.Edu: Rip, Mix & Burn Your Education. Technos: Quarterly for Education and Technology, 10, 16.

Gnuschke, J.E., & Wallace, J. (2004, Fall). Economic Impact of the Music Industry in Memphis and Shelby County. Business Perspectives, 16, 18.

Godwin-Jones, R. (2005). Emerging Technologies: Messaging, Gaming, Peer-to-Peer Sharing Language Learning Strategies & Tools for the Millennial Generation. Language, Learning & Technology, 9(1), 17.

Hansen, M.A., Matthews, B.A., Mosconi, P.A., & Sankaran, V. (2001). A Buyer's Guide to B2B Markets. 33.

Hogge, B. (2006, September 25). Goodbye and Good Riddance: Scrounging Music Industry Executives Will Soon Be a Thing of the Past, Writes Becky Hogge. New Statesman, 135, 68.

Johns, a. (2002). Pop Music Pirate Hunters. Daedalus, 131(2), 67.

Kajuter, H., Baumgartner, T., & Van, a. (2001). A Seller's Guide to B2B Markets. 37.

Leamer, E.E., & Storper, M. (2001). The Economic Geography of the Internet Age. Journal of International Business Studies, 32(4), 641.

Leighton, G., & Muldner, T. (2005). Applying Peer-to-Peer Technology to the Building of Distributed Educational Systems. Journal of Interactive Learning Research, 16(3), 295.

Lemley, M.A., & Reese, R.A. (2004). Reducing Digital Copyright Infringement without Restricting Innovation. Stanford Law Review, 56(6), 1345.

Lessig, L. (2001, November/December). The Internet under Siege. Foreign Policy 56.

Lobato, J. (2005). Paying for the Sins of Their Users: Liability and Growing Uncertainty in a Digital Age. Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy, 29(1), 357.

Madison, M.J. (2004). A Pattern-Oriented Approach to Fair Use. William and Mary Law Review, 45(4), 1525.

Mann, C.C. (2000, September). Heavenly Jukebox: Rampant Music Piracy May Hurt Musicians Less Than They Fear. The Real Threat - to Listeners and, Conceivably, Democracy Itself - Is the Music Industry's Reaction to it. The Atlantic Monthly, 286, v39-4244.

Rayport, J.F., & Sviokla, J.J. (1996). Exploiting the Virtual Value Chain. The McKinsey Quarterly, (1), 21.

Schwartz, R.W. (2003). Are Corporate Information Assets, in the Midst of Dynamic Technological and Infrastructural Advances Best Secured by Legal or Self-Help Remedies?. Houston Journal of International Law, 26(1), 163.

Sevcik, P. (2002, November). Accelerating Ecommerce. Business Communications Review, 32, 8.

Siwek, S.E. (2007, August 21). The True Cost of Sound Recording Piracy to the U.S. Economy. IPI Policy Report #188. Retrieved 2008, August 1:

http://www.ipi.org/ipi%5CIPIPublications.nsf/PublicationLookupFullText/5C2EE3D2107A4C228625733E0053A1F4

Tech-Tock: Is Time Up for the Networks? TiVo, Downloads, Other Options Raise Questions on Industry Future. (2005, December 30). The Washington Times, p. D04.

Tie, R. (2001). Get Ready for the World of B2B. Journal of Accountancy, 191(6), 49.

Your Message Must Fit a Buyer's Mindset. (2005, June 6). Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), p. 2.

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Title: Muisc Business

  • Total Pages: 4
  • Words: 1500
  • Bibliography:0
  • Citation Style: MLA
  • Document Type: Research Paper
Essay Instructions: Purpose: To research and identify strategies, trends, and precedents in the air travel and software industries that have parallels to the music industry and recommend how the parallels could be used or adapted to benefit the music industry.

Guidelines & Required Sections:
1. Characterize the air travel and software industries in terms of size (as measured in US and/or global revenue), age, stability, and degree of consolidation. Specific products, services or companies can be used to illustrate the present state of both industries.
2. For each selected non-music industry, identify & describe in detail two parallels between it and the music industry. I have selected the below described parallels between the air travel and software industries and the music industry so paper needs to elaborate on the following: (a) In spite of economic slowdown and loosing money the airline industry has kept its seats remarkably full using a business model that stresses sacrificing profit margin, (by constantly offering low prices), over a high turnover ratio, (dealing in volume). The music industry is also undergoing economic hard times but most major labels refuse to bring CD prices down. It is vital for the music industry strategist to realize that product prices must be reconsidered, (probably applying a similar business model as the one the airline industry has been using). Settling for a lower priced product might help reposition product with music buyers, (turned off by high prices and attracted by illegal downloading). (b) Internet technology allows consumers to be more specific about the music products they want, and it allows music buyers to establish a more detailed operating criteria for the investment of their leisure dollar. Airline industry has turned into an internet enabled industry, (sites like Expedia, Orbitz, etc), while the record industry still sees the internet as ?the enemy?. This can be translated into the record industry as the idea that a label built to stay ahead in the new millennium will likely have to adopt a continuous implementation of the latest technologies and show persistence on new initiatives, (i.e. the acceptance electronic distribution as a way to better serve their customers). (c) The software industry faces the same problem as the music industry in the sense that software products are also subject to internet piracy, illegal downloading and bootlegging. In spite of this, and contrary to the music industry, the software industry still finds ways to make a profit. This is mainly due to the software industry?s ability to constantly reinvent, repackage, incorporate value adds, etc, their product. The music industry can start solving its problems by using creativity, (the same way the software industry is using it), and developing new music products designed to entice audiophiles and music fans so that they are willing to pay for services on label-sponsored Web sites. This can be done by offering digitally pristine sound, (MP3 is still a form of audio file compression that slightly degrades the original product), that can be downloaded to hard drives and portable players and special features, such as artist interviews, artwork and graphics. Making the line between entertainment and marketing undistinguishable can both increase consumer satisfaction and propel traditional music sales. (d) Software & technology industry companies are constantly developing partnerships, synergy, joint ventures or cooperation (Apple developing the PC version of their iPod, Microsoft developing versions of their products for Mac, etc), while the music industry seems to ?isolate? itself. How can the music industry learn and adapt from this model.
3. Analyze each parallel in terms of its relevance to the music industry and recommend how the parallel could be used or adapted to benefit the music industry. Needs to be specific; avoid overviews and generalizations.
4. Bibliography is required.
5. MLA format is required.

Additional Information Provided
From The Economist print edition

The record industry is desperately seeking a way out of its problems
-- Reuters



HAVING failed to squelch digital piracy, can the record industry merge its
way out of trouble? That question has been around since late last year when
EMI, the world''s biggest independent record company, is said to have begun
talks to revive two old merger ideas. In time, some expect the five big
companies to become three.

Piracy remains the biggest headache. The record industry has squashed
Napster in the courts, but other online music-swapping services have sprung
up in its place. File-sharing on KaZaA was 1,491% higher in June 2002 than
in June 2001, according to ComScore Media Metrix, a research group. The
industry is suing this and other file-sharing services, but new ones emerge
as fast as old ones are shut down. Little wonder that sales of recorded
music dropped in 2002 by an estimated 9%.

In this shrinking market, the savings that might be squeezed from a merger
offer a lifeline. In the past, European regulators have been an obstacle,
repeatedly blocking mergers among the big five record companies?Vivendi''s
Universal Music, Sony Music, EMI, AOL Time Warner''s Warner Music, and
Bertelsmann''s BMG?which between them control 70% of the global
recorded-music market. In 2000, they blocked a merger of Warner and EMI by
imposing heavy divestment conditions. They stopped EMI marrying BMG even
before a formal proposal was tabled.

In its present state, the record industry may get a more sympathetic
hearing; and Brussels, having lost several court cases over mergers, is less
obstructive. Though talks are preliminary, and the BMG option is not ruled
out, EMI is more likely to do a deal with Warner. The two firms complement
each other: EMI is strong in Europe and weak in America, Warner the
opposite. Alain Levy, EMI''s boss, has streamlined his firm, but savings from
a merger could still reach about ?150m ($240m), says Brett Hucker of Merrill
Lynch.

There remain obstacles to a deal, however. AOL Time Warner, under pressure
to pay off debt, needs cash, but this could be hard for EMI to provide given
its own large debts. There would also be awkward negotiations about who
would run the combined firm. Mr Levy, who has cut the flab and curbed the
extravagance at EMI, would resist ceding any control. Regulators might
quibble over combining their music-publishing operations.

Consolidation is but one of three strategies that the industry hopes will
help it survive as it works out how to beat the pirates. A second is a
renewed effort to rely less on instant stars and more on long-term talent.
Overnight stars can fade as fast as they are born. Hear''Say, a British band
assembled by a TV talent show two years ago and signed to Vivendi
Universal''s Polydor, went straight to number one with its first album; now,
the band has split up. EMI, by contrast, launched Norah Jones, a singer who
blends country, folk and blues, a year ago. Her first album, ?Come away with
me?, took 46 weeks to top the American charts; at this week''s Grammy
ceremony, she won eight awards.

A third idea is to transform narrowly defined record firms into broader
music companies. Revenues from touring, concerts, sponsorship and so on
added about 40% to global sales of recorded music in 2001, making the global
music industry worth $47.6 billion, according to a recent report by Music
Week, a trade title. Some new sorts of music revenues are emerging: sales of
snatches of songs to use as mobile-phone ring-tones raised $71m last year
for artists, according to Informa Media, a research group?small, but 58% up
on 2001.

For a true star, the extra pot is far bigger: record companies get only 15%
of all revenues generated by such an artist, although they have made the
star''s name and marketed his brand. The rest goes to the singer, agent,
manager, producer and assorted other hangers-on. Although only such
mega-stars as Eminem or Christina Aguilera pull in serious money from such
activities, they represent a handy pot which, at the moment, the record
companies have no fingers in. Now, they are trying to rectify this. The
apparently extravagant recent record deal between EMI and Robbie Williams
was a bid by Mr Levy to reorient his company in this way. The deal, in
effect, gives EMI a stake in Robbie Inc and in all his future earnings.

But even if the industry buys itself time through consolidation and other
strategies, its long-term health requires a solution to piracy. Investing in
musicians is ultimately about building a back catalogue of hits that provide
an ongoing source of revenues. But what is the point of a back catalogue if
pirates are helping themselves to its tracks for nothing? If that is the
outcome, the winners from today''s merger talks could simply be the sellers.




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References

The Music Industry In a spin, The Economist, Feb 27th, 2003

Frank Rose, The Civil War Inside Sony, WIRED Magazine Issue 11.02 - February 2003

Jon Hilkevitch, FAA predicts airline industry recovery Chicago Tribune March 18, 2003

Shares fall but Easyjet figures grow, Birmingham Post, 01-09-2003, pp 22.

Case Study: MP3 Downloading and Napster:

http://www.ug.it.usyd.edu.au/isys1003/assignments/napstercase.doc.

Financial Condition Of The Airline Industry, Subcommittee on Aviation Report, Available online at http://www.house.gov/transportation/aviation/09-24-02/09-24-02memo.html

DAN RICHMAN Software: Industry healthy, but could be made better SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER Monday, December 23, 2002 http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/business/101071_yesoft23.shtml

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