Hezbollah Essays and Research Papers

Instructions for Hezbollah College Essay Examples

Title: Hezbollah

  • Total Pages: 5
  • Words: 1437
  • References:4
  • Citation Style: APA
  • Document Type: Essay
Essay Instructions: The paper must discuss the concept and implications of terrorism. The particular tenets of Hezbollah must be addressed, discussing their perceived grievances, ideologies, and goals.

[ Order Custom Essay ]

[ View Full Essay ]

Excerpt From Essay:
References:

References:

Morag, N., September 2006, The Economic and Social Effects of Intensive Terrorism: Israel, 2000-2004, The Middle East Review of International Affairs, Vol. 10. No. 3

Persitz, D., The Economic Effects of Terrorism: Counterfactual Analysis of the Case of Israel, American Economic Association, Retrieved from http://www.aeaweb.org/annual_mtg_papers/2007/0106_1015_1802.pdf on June 22, 2009

2002, Who Are Hezbollah? BBC News, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/1908671.stm last accessed on June 22, 2009

2009, Hezbollah, Military Advantage, http://www.military.com/Resources/ResourceFileView?file=Hezbollah-Organization.htm last accessed on June 22, 2009

What is Terrorism? Terrorism Research, http://www.terrorism-research.com / last accessed on June 22, 2009

Order Custom Essay On This Topic

Title: Terrorist Group Factors for Formation and Continued Operations

  • Total Pages: 9
  • Words: 2787
  • Works Cited:15
  • Citation Style: MLA
  • Document Type: Research Paper
Essay Instructions: This paper should be an assessment of the factors that are conducive to the formation and continued operation of one terrorist group. It can be any one group from the following list: Al Qaeda, Hamas, Hezbollah, Abu Sayyaf, Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, or Lashkar e Taiba).

Please note: conducive factors does not include obstacles that the group has faced, nor counter-terrorism programs by the US or other governnents.

Footnotes should be at bottom of the page when cited.

Please keep quotations to a minimum.

Thank you.

[ Order Custom Essay ]

[ View Full Essay ]

Excerpt From Essay:
Works Cited:

References

Baranovich, Nadia, and Ravichandran Moorthy. "The Dynamics of Terror Strategies by Hezbollah and Hamas in the Israel-Palestine Conflict." Tamkang Journal of International Affairs 14, no. 4 (2011): 28-61.

Byman, Daniel. "Should Hezbollah be next?" Foreign Affairs (2003): 54-66.

Cohen, Ariel. "Knowing the Enemy." Policy Review 145 (2007): 40-53.

Feldman, Shai. "The Hezbollah-Israel War: A Preliminary Assessment." Middle East Brief 10, no. 2 (2006).

Grace, Robert and Andrew Mandelbaum. "Understanding the Iran-Hezbollah Connection." United States Institute of Peace (2009).

Haddad, Simon. "The origins of popular support for Lebanon's Hezbollah." Studies in Conflict & Terrorism 29, no. 1 (2006): 21-34.

Hamad, Rita. "After Terror." Harvard International Review 22, no. 1 (2000).

Harik, Judith. Hezbollah: The Changing Face of Terrorism. New York: I.B. Tauris.

Jaber, Hala. Hezbollah: Born with a Vengeance. New York: Columbia University Press, 1997.

Kulick, Amir. "Hizbollah vs. The IDF: The Operational Dimension." Strategic Assessment 9, no. 3 (2006).

Levitt, Matthew. "Hezbollah: Party of Fraud." Foreign Affairs 27 (2011).

Long, Benjamin. "The role of the American corporate media in U.S. policy: framing Hezbollah." American University in Cairo (2012).

Mannes, Aaron. "Dangerous Liaisons: Hamas after the Assassination of Yassin." Middle East Intelligence Bulletin 6, no. 4 (2004).

Norton, Augustus Richard. Hezbollah: A Short History. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2009.

Salamey, Imad, and Frederic Pearson. "Hezbollah: a proletarian party with an Islamic manifesto -- a sociopolitical analysis of Islamist populism in Lebanon and the Middle East." Small Wars & Insurgencies 18, no. 3 (2007): 416-438.

Hala Jaber. Hezbollah: Born with a Vengeance. New York: Columbia University Press, 1997.

Augustus Richard Norton. Hezbollah: A Short History. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2009.

Jaber.

Ibid.

Norton.

Jaber.

Norton.

Jaber.

Norton.

Aaron Mannes. "Dangerous Liaisons: Hamas after the Assassination of Yassin." Middle East Intelligence Bulletin 6, no. 4 (2004).

Rita Hamad. "After terror." Harvard International Review 22, no. 1 (2000).

Simon Haddad. "The origins of popular support for Lebanon's Hezbollah." Studies in Conflict & Terrorism 29, no. 1 (2006): 21-34.

Norton.

Jaber.

Haddad.

Imad Salamey and Frederic Pearson. "Hezbollah: a proletarian party with an Islamic manifesto -- a sociopolitical analysis of Islamist populism in Lebanon and the Middle East." Small Wars & Insurgencies 18, no. 3 (2007): 416-438.

Nadia Baranovich and Ravichandran Moorthy. "The Dynamics of Terror Strategies by Hezbollah and Hamas in the Israel-Palestine Conflict." Tamkang Journal of International Affairs 14, no. 4 (2011): 28-61.

Ibid.

Ariel Cohen. "Knowing the Enemy." Policy Review 145 (2007): 40-53.

Shai Feldman. "The Hezbollah-Israel War: A Preliminary Assessment." Middle East Brief 10, no. 2 (2006).

Amir Kulick. "Hizbollah vs. The IDF: The Operational Dimension." Strategic Assessment 9, no. 3 (2006).

Jaber.

Norton.

Haddad.

Robert Grace and Andrew Mandelbaum. "Understanding the Iran-Hezbollah Connection." United States Institute of Peace (2009).

Haddad.

Kulick.

Feldman.

Mannes.

Norton.

Grace & Mandelbaum.

Benjamin Long. "The role of the American corporate media in U.S. policy: framing Hezbollah." American University in Cairo (2012).

Judith Harik. Hezbollah: The Changing Face of Terrorism. New York: I.B. Tauris.

Long.

Salamey & Pearson.

Daniel Byman. "Should Hezbollah be next?." Foreign Affairs (2003): 54-66.

Byman.

Matthew Levitt. "Hezbollah: Party of Fraud." Foreign Affairs 27 (2011).

Ibid.

Byman.

Grace & Mandelbaum.

Long.

Grace & Mandelbaum.

Hamad.

Salamey & Pearson.

Ibid.

Haddad.

Harik.

Mannes.

Levitt.

Salamey & Pearson.

Grace & Mandelbaum.

Order Custom Essay On This Topic

Title: The military development of Hezbollah

  • Total Pages: 33
  • Words: 9563
  • Bibliography:40
  • Citation Style: APA
  • Document Type: Essay
Essay Instructions: Please create the chapter outline as follows - it will also help with the focus immensely and save you a lot of time:

Chapter 1: Introduction
Chapter 2: Arming of Hezbollah by Syria and Iran
Chapter 3: Lebanon War 2006
Chapter 4: Israel's response with the building of the Iron Dome
Chapter 5: Conclusion

Bullet points about the content of chapters 2-4:

Chapter 2 is basically about the WHY and HOW Hezbollah came into existence.
Syria and Iran and their distinct connection to Hezbollah.
How Hezbollah has grown into an armed force.

Chapter 3 must include material on the (main) type of missiles being launched by Hezbollah in the Lebanon War 2006 - these were mainly Katyusha missiles.
Description of the missiles necessary.
Again, links to Iran.
Please bring also in a comparison to North Korea.
Researching online on the newspaper page of 'Ha'aretz' (for example) might give additional information on the Lebanon War 2006.

Chapter 4 is about Israel's building of the so called 'Iron Dome'.
There are various sources online available about the Iron Dome.
The idea behind it.
How the Iron Dome works.
Specifics.


- Direct quotations from the published or unpublished work of others must always be clearly identified as such by being placed inside quotation marks, and a full reference to their source must be provided in proper form.

- Please avoid series of short quotations from several different sources because if not clearly identified as such, it is just as much considered to be 'cheating' than using a single unacknowledged long quotation from a single source.

- FOOTNOTES should be placed either at the bottom of the relevant page OR at the end of the dissertation.

- The BIBLIOGRAPHY must list all works used in the preparation of the dissertation, including all those noted in the references.

- For obvious reasons it would be good to use at least around 40 source materials. However, the quality of the paper counts, and if that means that the writer will only use 30+ I shall be happy with it, too.

- Be specific and don't write in any extreme 'polemical' way. This is a RESEARCH paper and not an essay.

- While doing your research keep in mind that Hezbollah is spelled in several ways: Hezbollah, Hizbollah, Hizbullah, Hizballah - and these words with a ' in between (e.g. Hizbu'llah or Hizb'allah).

- It is fine to online sources such as notable newspapers, magazines and papers but please let the majority of your source materials be books.

- I am ordering a 33-page dissertation because it says that it should result in approximately 9900 words. If that information helps you in any way - I don't care about the number of pages, it's the number of the words that is relevant to me (close to 10.000) and not the exact number of pages.



Another great help will be this list of relevant books on this topic:


- 'Hizbu'llah - Politics and Religion' by Amal SAAD-GHORAYEB
- 'Hezbollah' - A short history' by Augustus Richard NORTON
- 'Unholy War - Terror in the name of Islam' by John L. ESPOSITO
- 'A Month of Terror - A month of war between the Israelis and the Hezbollah' by Frank SENAUTH
- '34 Days - Israel, Hezbollah, and the Lebanon' by Amos HAREL and Avi ISSACHAROFF
- 'Militant Islamic Movements in Lebanon: Origins, Social Basis and Ideology' by Marius DEEB
- 'Hizb'allah in Lebanon - The politics of the Western Hostage Crisis' by Magnus RANSTORP
- 'Israel and Hizbollah - An assymetric conflict in historical and comparative perspective' ed. by Clive JONES and Serigio CATIGNANI
- 'Hezbollah - Born with a vengeance' by Hala JABER
- 'In the Path of Hizbullah' by Ahmad Nizar HAMZEH
- 'Summer Rain' by Annette LEVY-WILLARD
- 'A History of Modern Israel' by Colin SHINDLER
- 'Hezbollah Military Activities' ed. by Frederic P. MILLER ('High Quality Content by Wikipedia articles')
- 'Hezbollah Rocket Force' ed. by Lambert M. SURHONE ('High Quality Content by Wikipedia articles')
- 'Syria and Iran - Diplomatic alliance and power politics in the Middle East' by Jubin M. GOODARZI
- 'Syria and Iran - Rivalry and cooperation' by Hussein J. AGHA and Ahmad S. KHALIDI
- 'Inventing the Axis of Evil - The truth about North Korea, Iran, and Syria' by Bruce CUMINGS, Ervand ABRAHAMIAN, Moshe MA'OZ
- 'Korea - The East Asian pivot' - ed. by Jonathan D. POLLACK

[ Order Custom Essay ]

[ View Full Essay ]

Excerpt From Essay:
Bibliography:

References

1. Ajami, F. (1986): The Vanished Imam: Musa al-Sadr and the Shia of Lebanon, Cornell University Press.

2. Byman, D. (2003) "Should Hezbollah Be Next?," in Foreign Affair, Vol. 82, n. 6, pp. 54-66.

3. Cobban, H. (1987): The Making of Modern Lebanon, Hutchinson, London.

4. Cobban, H. (1985): The Shia Community and the Future of Lebanon, American Institute for Islamic Affairs, Occasional Paper n. 2.

5. Fisk, R. (2001): Pity the Nation: Lebanon at War, Oxford University Press, Oxford.

6. Greene, T.H. (1984): Comparative Revolutionary Movements, Prentice Hall, London.

7. Gronbech- Jensen, C. (1999): "The European Union and the Case of South Lebanon," in Mediterranean Politics, Vol. 4, n. 3, pp. 1-22.

8. Haddad, S. & Jamali, D. (2003): "The Politics of Refugees' Non-Integration: The Dilemma of Palestinian in Lebanon," in Journal of International Migration and Integration, Vol. 4, n. 1, pp.1-22.

9. Hamzeh, A. (1993): "Lebanon's Hizbullah: from Islamic revolution to parliamentary accommodation," in Third World Quarterly, Vol. 14, n. 2, pp. 25-36.

10. Hamzeh, A. (2000): "Lebanon's Islamist and local politics: a new reality," in Third World Quarterly, Vol. 21, n. 5, pp. 739-759.

11. Halliday, F. (2005): Middle East in International Relations: Power, Politics and Ideology, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.22

12. Halliday, F. (2003): Islam and the Myths of confrontation, I.B. Tauris, London.

13. Hamzeh, A. (2002): In the Path of Hizbullah, Syracuse University Press, New York

14. Hollis, R. & Shehadi, N. (1996): Lebanon on Hold: Implications for the Middle East Peace Process, Royal Institute of International Affairs and Centre for Lebanese Studies, London.

15. INTERNATIONAL CRISIS GROUP (2005): "Lebanon: Managing the Gathering Storm," Middle East Briefing, n. 48, 5 December.

16. INTERNATIONAL CRISIS GROUP (2005): "Syria after Lebanon, Lebanon after Syria," Middle East Report n. 39, 12 April.

17. INTERNATIONAL CRISIS GROUP (2003): "Hizbollah: rebel without a cause?" Middle East Briefing, 30 July.

18. INTERNATIONAL CRISIS GROUP (2002): "Old Games New Rules: conflict on the Israel-Lebanon border," Middle East Report n. 7, 18 November.

19. INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR STRATEGIC STUDIES, (2000): Stuck in the Lebanese 'mud': Israel's withdrawal from south Lebanon, Vol. 6 Issue 3, April 2000.

20. Jaber, H. (1997): Hezbollah: Born with a Vengeance, Columbia University Press, New York.

21. Kamrava, M. (2005): The Modern Middle East: A Political History since the First World War, University of California Press, Berkeley and Los Angeles.

22. Khalaf, S. (2002): Civil and Uncivil Violence in Lebanon: A History of the Internationalization of Communal Conflict, Columbia University Press, New York.

23. Norton, A.R. (2000) "Lebanon's Malaise," in Survival, Vol. 42, n. 4, pp. 35-50.

24. Picard, E. (1993), The Lebanese Shia and Political Violence, UNRISD Discussion Paper, n. 42, April.

25. Qassem, N. (2005): Hizbullah: The Story from Within, Saqi Books, London.

26. Rubin, B. & Keaney, T.A. (2002): Armed Forces in the Middle East: Politics and Strategy, Frank Cass Publishers, London.

27. Saad- Ghorayeb, A. (2002): Hizbu'llah Politics and Religion, Pluto Press, London.

28. Salibi, K. (1988): A House of Many Mansion, I.B. Tauris, London.

29. Rubin, U (2010). The Rocket Campaign against Israel during the 2006 Lebanon War. The Begin-Sadat Center for Strategic Studies. Retrieved 15 August 2010

Order Custom Essay On This Topic

Title: would like you to answer these questions with 50 words each

  • Total Pages: 2
  • Words: 780
  • Sources:0
  • Citation Style: Harvard
  • Document Type: Research Paper
Essay Instructions: Task: I would like you to answer these questions with 50 words each and I want Tomar to complete this order

1. Has Australia acted in its national interest in dealing with East Timor over oil and gas resources in the Timor Sea?


2. Is it fair that the Kyoto Protocol does not include developing countries in its first stage of cutting greenhouse gas emissions? Why (not)?


3. Give a personal witness account of Australia’s environment (air, land, sea, or climate) – what has changed? For better or worse? I'd like to hear your story.



4. Is human security a goal behind Australia’s decision to go to war in Iraq? To what extent has Australia and the Coalition of the Willing achieved that goal?


5 . Did the Howard government (1996-2007) get it right on Australia’s policy on refugees and asylum seekers?

6 . Recently, there has been an increase in the arrival of boat people in Australian waters. Is the Rudd government’s policy change on refugees (from the Howard era) responsible for the increase?


7. 'Do we give too much attention and resources to terrorism threats when other areas pose a greater threat to our society (such as some diseases) but we do not appropriate as many resources to them?'

8. The definition of a terrorist is contentious. Not only Israel, but America consider Hezbollah as a terrorist organization (I think Britain and Australia only consider the armed wing of Hezbollah as terrorists as opposed to its political wing). Hezbollah would argue that they legitimately fight against Israel's aggression in southern Lebanon. I don't want to justify either side, but does Hezbollah have a point? Are they simply fighting Israeli aggression defending southern Lebanon, and so not terrorists?

9. Do you think that a more concentrated effort on the perceived root causes of terrorism, such as poverty, financial support for groups, etc, would be more effective than either the direct or hearts and minds approaches?

10. I am just wondering how many people think that the 'war on terror' and other anti-terrorist activities actually encourages a greater threat by deepening anti-US/Western sentiment?

What sort of impact do you think it will have in the long run?



11. There seems to be an awful lot of talk about "hate" being the fundamental driving force behind today's level of insurgencies and terrorism. Hate for another culture, politics, religion or imposed ideology or as Bush banged on and on about, hate of western systems/values/freedoms.

Do you think that this simple (sometimes arrogant) analysis really is at the heart and the motivational force behind terrorism? And, if so, does it not make the process of negotiation all the more vital to weaken their resolve?

I’m thinking about how long it took the British Government and IRA to come to the negotiating table or the international community to bring Israel and Palestine into a peace process. Why did it take so long and so much terror and destruction before committing to a process of negotiations? Would the global community ever consider negotiating with al-Qaeda?

[ Order Custom Essay ]

[ View Full Essay ]

Excerpt From Essay:
Order Custom Essay On This Topic
Request A Custom Essay On This Topic Request A Custom Essay
Testimonials:
“I really do appreciate HelpMyEssay.com. I'm not a good writer and the service really gets me going in the right direction. The staff gets back to me quickly with any concerns that I might have and they are always on time.’’ Tiffany R
“I have had all positive experiences with HelpMyEssay.com. I will recommend your service to everyone I know. Thank you!’’ Charlotte H
“I am finished with school thanks to HelpMyEssay.com. They really did help me graduate college.’’ Bill K