Heroes Essays and Research Papers

Instructions for Heroes College Essay Examples

Title: Heroes Classical Western World This essay assignment asks ancient Greek Roman works read Iliad Odyssey Aeneid For essay reference works Be focus essay a strong thesis organize a specific main points support response evidence text texts discussing quotations respond prompts Choose major hero readings discuss hero terms good choices poor choices makes

  • Total Pages: 3
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Essay Instructions: Heroes of the Classical Western World

This first essay assignment asks you to think about the ancient Greek and Roman works that we have read, the Iliad, the Odyssey, and the Aeneid. For this essay, you may only reference these three works. Be sure to focus your essay on a strong thesis, organize it around a few specific main points, and support your response with evidence from the text or texts you are discussing, especially quotations, as you respond to one of the following prompts:

Choose one major hero from the readings so far and discuss that hero in terms of the good choices and the poor choices he makes. How, overall, do these come together to give you a particular view, positive or negative, of this hero? Be sure to illustrate your thesis and supporting points with evidence from the work you are using.
Consider our two wandering heroes, Odysseus and Aeneas, and compare their actions during their time ?on the road.? What seem to be their worst moments and why? Does either seem to out-do the other in finding a real low point in his adventures?

Think about one of the heroes we have seen and consider the issue of who you see as that hero's main antagonist. Identify the conflict between the hero and his antagonist, and create an argument about how that particular relationship fits into the epic model. What makes this an epic conflict?

Compare two heroes from different works, and create an argument about how each fits into the definition of an epic hero. What characteristics do they share? What characteristics are different, and how can we stretch the concept of ?epic hero? to cover both figures?


Please be sure your essay also meets the following guidelines:

Have a word count of 600-900 words. (check with your instructor before submitting anything longer)
Format the essay using MLA essay format (this includes double spacing, indenting all paragraphs, and using required headers) and MLA-style citations, including a works cited list at the end; for help with MLA format, please visit Diana Hacker's Research and Documentation Online
Spell check, and watch out for homonyms!

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Works Cited

Illiad, The. Samuel Butler. Charleston, SC: CreateSpace, 2010.

Heroes Classical Western world

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Title: I paper compare contrast heroes rite passages author Joseph Campbell's The Hero a Thousand Faces explains concepts mythology terms hero's cyle Three characters compare bilbo baggins hobbit Jen dark crystal Harry Potter Harry Potter Sorcerer's Stone

  • Total Pages: 4
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Essay Instructions: I would like the paper to compare and contrast three heroes rite of passages of the author Joseph Campbell's, "The Hero with a Thousand Faces" it explains his concepts of mythology in terms of the hero's cyle. Three characters to compare would be bilbo baggins from the hobbit, Jen from the dark crystal, and Harry Potter from Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. The three rites of passage I would like the paper to be about are atonement with the father, apotheosis, and the ultimate boon ofcourse if not all the characters experience these three then that is fine I would just like a good comparison between the three characters. The source I would like cited is Joseph Campbell, "The Hero With a Thousand Faces."

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REFERENCES

Bittarello, M. "ReCrafting the Past: The Complex Relationship Between Myth and Ritual." Pomegranate: The International Journal of Pagan Studies. 10 (2): 210-24, Print.

Campbell, J., et.al. The Hero's Journey: Joseph Campbell on his Life and Work. New York: New World Library, 2003, Print.

Campbell, J. The Hero With a Thousand Faces. New York: New World Library, 2008, Print..

Holquin, B., et.al. The Dark Crystal: Creation Myths, Volume 1. Los Angeles, CA: Arachia Publishers, 2011, Print.

Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. New York: Scholastic Press, 1998.

Tolkien, J.R.R. The Hobbit -- or There and Back Again. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1966, Print.

Voytilla, S. Myth and the Movies. Los Angeles, CA: Michael Wiese Productions, 1999, Print.

Monomyth

For example, what is the relationship between the journey, the quest, or the hero. How many movies are structured with the idea of conflict and triumph over odds -- even movies like Star Wars.

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Title: Hero has the ability to

  • Total Pages: 15
  • Words: 4555
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  • Document Type: Essay
Essay Instructions: I need (16) sixteen-page essay on the World Literature course.
There are twelve separate questions that need to be answered thoroughly.
You will need to use about 1 to 2 pages depending on question.
I'll include the literature textbook materials.


1) What makes a hero?

What makes a person a hero? Is it an ability to face difficult situations and come out victorious? Is it an ability to rescue or help other people? Is it a determination to stay true to a cause that may be unpopular or dangerous?
For this essay you're going to write about what you think makes a hero and identify a contemporary hero who is real or fictional.
Your essay should describe your hero and then analyze him or her using these questions:
• What sort of evil or oppression does your hero confront?
• Why does he or she confront evil? What's the motivation?
• For whom does your hero confront evil?
• What virtues does your hero represent?
• Your response to these questions should be written in paragraph form and should be 2 paragraphs long.


2) Responding to Beowulf (Read pages 21-31)

Answer the following questions about Beowulf. Your answers should be written in one paragraph for each question.

1. Images are words that help us see something and often hear it, smell it, taste it and touch it as well. Identify three images describing Grendel that associate him with death or darkness. How are these images supposed to affect the way you feel about him?
2. List three ways that Gardener's depiction of Grendel in the excerpt of "Grendel" differs from the epic's description of him. Did Gardner make you sympathize with him? Explain.
3. The Connection "Life in 999: A Grim Struggle" describes daily life in late Anglo-Saxon England. What details in this picture of daily life relate to what you've read so far in Beowulf? How does life in 999 compare with life today? List at least three similarities to life in the story and three differences with life today.



3) Epic Conventions and Epic Heroes (Read pages 44-53)

After reading the explanation of epics by David Adams Lemming on pages 44 and 45 of your text, make a list of six of the main features that define an epic. As you read The Epic of Gilgamesh, keep track of elements of the story that match the features of an epic poem.
• At the end of the story, you will write a two paragraph argument explaining why or why not The Epic of Gilgamesh is a good example of an epic poem.
• You will need to support your answer will specific quotes and details from the text.
________________________________________

4) Responding to Gilgamesh (Read pages 44-53)

Answer the following questions about the epic of Gilgamesh.

1. Does the epic of Gilgamesh meet the requirements of an epic poem? Your answer to this question should be two paragraphs long, and you should include specific quotes and details from the story to support your position.
2. Enkidu acts as a foil to Gilgamesh. What do you learn about Gilgamesh's strengths and weaknesses by contrasting him to Enkidu? Write a paragraph discussing the similarities and differences in the motivations, decisions and outcomes that Enkidu and Gilgamesh deal with.



5) Defining Honor (Read pages 55-66)

The Iliad is essentially a war story, and its heroes are warriors; but men like Achilles and Hector are not just bloodthirsty killers eager for their next fight. They also strive to achieve arête, or personal honor and excellence. In their eyes it is honorable to fight bravely for one's king and comrades, and dishonorable to seek safety for oneself when one's friends are threatened. To die at the hands of a more powerful enemy is far preferable to living with the dishonor of having fled a fight or failed to give one's all in battle

• What do the concepts of honor and personal excellence mean to you?
• How can an ideal of honor make society a better place? Could it also harm society? I'd like you to write down your own definition of honor and personal excellence.
• Do you agree with Homer? I'd also like you to write down what you think society's definition of honor is. As you're reading think about how your definition of honor and today's definition of honor are similar and different from Homer's arête.
________________________________________

6) Responding to Literature (Read pages 55-66)

Answer the following questions. Your answers should be written in one paragraph for each question.

1. Was Hector doomed by fate? List three different examples of, to, or discussion of fate in the story, and explain what effect they had on the outcome for the character to which they refer.
2. List three examples of hubris, or extreme pride, you see in the story or you hear about happening before the story begins. How does the hubris affect Hector's ultimate fate?
3. Achilles and Hector are rival warriors, but are they both heroes? Discuss your opinion of each character in terms of the Greek view of arête, or honor, and your own view of it.
4. The Iliad is primarily a war epic. In your opinion, is the Iliad condemnation of the brutality of war, a celebration of the heroism that war can inspire, or an evenly developed examination of both of these aspects? Justify your answer with specific examples from the epic and from life. Your answer should be at least five sentences long.



7) Honor and Loyalty (Read pages 194-200)

We've read about 4 different heroes from different cultures and time periods (Beowulf, Wilgaf, Gilgamesh, and Achilles). Now that you've read these stories and are going to be reading another story (“The Legend of Arthur”) where loyalty and honor play a very important role, I'd like you to do the following:

1. Consider how Arthur's actions and personality agree with or challenge your definition of honor. Write a few sentences comparing your definition with Arthur's actions and personality.
2. Write a brief paragraph explaining the importance or unimportance of loyalty in being honorable.






8) Irony in “The Canterbury Tales” (Read pages 120-142)

Irony is where the opposite of what is expected to happen happens or a conflict between what is actually true and what appears to be true. Many of the characters introduced in the prologue are portrayed ironically and Chaucer beautifully describes the inconsistencies between what they should be or could be and what they actually are.

• Choose three of the characters introduced in the prologue and explain how Chaucer's description of that character is ironic.
• Describe how the characters' true nature is revealed through their characterization including their physical descriptions and what they say. Include in your response a summary of how they are described and an explanation of why that is ironic.
________________________________________


9) What Women Want (Read pages 155-166)

The Wife of Bath is one of the most recognizable pilgrims. She is a married woman from Bath. Having outlived five husbands (and possibly looking for a sixth on the road to Canterbury) she is witty, intelligent and opinionated. The tale she tells is one of the marriage group, a group of tales that explore what men and women expect from and ought to do in marriage. In the tale, a knight must find the answer to the question:

• What do women want? Is it fame? Fortune? Security? Write a paragraph answering this question: What do women want?
• Think about what you think women want from men and out of marriage. Then, read the story to see how your answer compares with hers.
________________________________________


10) The Wife of Bath (Read pages 155-166)

Answer the following questions. Make sure to write your answers in sentence format.

1. What opinions does the Wife of Bath express in her tale? What do all her opinions-and her tale itself-tell you about her character?
2. Do you think Chaucer's rich portrayal of the Wife of Bath is an indication that he had progressive views about women for his time? Why or why not?
3. What do men and women each think the other wants most out of life? Out of a relationship? How have attitudes changed since Chaucer's time?


11) Revisiting the Monster Archetype

Think of monsters you might find in popular stories or movies today. What do they look like? What do they act like? How does he/she feel about other people?

• Make a list of 10 characteristics that most villains or modern monsters seem to have in common.
• As you read "The Third Voyage of Sinbad the Sailor," think about how the giant in this story is like or unlike other monsters you've studied and heard about in popular culture.
________________________________________


12) Late Breaking News (Read page 110)

Take one of the basic situations from the ballads and retell it as a contemporary news story. Like a reporter, be sure to tell what happened, where and when it happened, to whom it happened, why it happened and how it happened. Your essay should be at least two paragraphs long.



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Title: journals

  • Total Pages: 10
  • Words: 2709
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  • Citation Style: MLA
  • Document Type: Research Paper
Essay Instructions: Topic Journal
Beowulf as a Hero
Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 1 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.3A: What makes a hero?

What makes a person a hero? Is it an ability to face difficult situations and come out victorious? Is it an ability to rescue or help other people? Is it a determination to stay true to a cause that may be unpopular or dangerous?

For this journal entry you're going to write about what you think makes a hero and identify a contemporary hero who is real or fictional. Your journal should describe your hero and then analyze him or her using these questions:

What sort of evil or oppression does your hero confront?
Why does he or she confront evil? What's the motivation?
For whom does your hero confront evil?
What virtues does your hero represent?
Your response to these questions should be written in paragraph form and should be 1 or 2 paragraphs long.
Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 2 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.3B: The Epic Hero


The "Literary Focus" on page 20 of your text describes the characteristics of an epic hero that I listed earlier in the lesson. From your text's description, write list headings for four (4) main characteristics of an epic hero. As you read Beowulf, fill in your list with examples from the text under each of the headings that reflect these qualities. For example, one of the characteristics of an epic hero is that he or she is on a quest. As you read Beowulf, note examples from the text that describe Beowulf's adventure as a quest. After reading you should have at least two examples from the text for each characteristic.

Your list of characteristics of an epic hero should include:

Is on a quest,
Has superior or superhuman strength, intellect and/or courage,
Makes ethical choices,
Risks his life for the benefit of others or society,
Demonstrates bravery through his actions,
Reflects the values and culture of the society in which he lives, and
Is glorified by the person or people he saves.
Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 3 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.3C: Responding to Beowulf

Answer the following questions about Beowulf in your journal. Your answers should be written in paragraph form. Make sure to label them with the appropriate journal number.

Images are words that help us see something and often hear it, smell it, taste it and touch it as well. Identify three images
describing Grendel that associate him with death or darkness. How are these images supposed to affect the way you feel about him?
List three ways that Gardener's depiction of Grendel in the excerptof Grendel differs from the epic's description of him. Did Gardner make you sympathize with him? Explain.
3. The Connection "Life in 999: A Grim Struggle" describes daily life in late Anglo-Saxon England. What details in this picture of daily life relate to what you've read so far in Beowulf? How does life in 999 compare with life today? List at least three similarities to life inthe story and three differences with life today
The Legacy of Beowulf
Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 4 of 16

Journal Exercise: 1.4A: Kennings

Pages 41 and 42 of your text give an excellent explanation of kennings both as they're used in Beowulf and as they are used today. Read over this information and then answer the following questions in your journal.

Look back over lines 1-126 of the text and identify at least two examples of kennings written as hyphenated compounds, two written as prepositional phrases and two written as possessives. Identify what each kenning refers to.
Compile a list of 5 modern kennings, like headhunter.
The Epic of Gilgamesh
Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 5 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.5A: Epic Conventions and Epic Heroes

After reading the explanation of epics by David Adams Lemming on pages 44 and 45 of your text, make a list of six of the main features that define an epic. As you read The Epic of Gilgamesh, keep track of elements of the story that match the features of an epic poem.

At the end of the story, you will write a two paragraph argument explaining why or why not The Epic of Gilgamesh is a good example of an epic poem.
You will need to support your answer will specific quotes and details from the text.
Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 6 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.5B: Responding to Gilgamesh

Answer the following questions about the epic of Gilgamesh in your journal.

Does the epic of Gilgamesh meet the requirements of an epic poem? Your answer to this question should be two paragraphs long, and you should include specific quotes and details from the story to support your position. Use the list of qualities of an epic poem you created at the beginning of this story and the notes you took while reading. Please make sure to proofread your answer for spelling and grammar.
Enkidu acts as a foil to Gilgamesh. What do you learn about Gilgamesh's strengths and weaknesses by contrasting him to Enkidu? Look back at the notes you took during your reading and write a paragraph discussing the similarities and differences in the motivations, decisions and outcomes that Enkidu and Gilgamesh deal with.
Heroic Achilles
Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 7 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.6A: Defining Honor

The Iliad is essentially a war story, and its heroes are warriors; but men like Achilles and Hector are not just bloodthirsty killers eager for their next fight. They also strive to achieve arête, or personal honor and excellence. In their eyes it is honorable to fight bravely for one's king and comrades, and dishonorable to seek safety for oneself when one's friends are threatened. To die at the hands of a more powerful enemy is far preferable to living with the dishonor of having fled a fight or failed to give one's all in battle

What do the concepts of honor and personal excellence mean to you?
How can an ideal of honor make society a better place? Could it also harm society? I'd like you to write down your own definition of honor and personal excellence.
Do you agree with Homer? I'd also like you to write down what you think society's definition of honor is. As you're reading think about how your definition of honor and today's definition of honor are similar and different from Homer's arête.
Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 8 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.6B: Responding to Literature

Answer the following questions in your journal. Your answers should be written in paragraph form.

Was Hector doomed by fate? List three different examples of, to, or discussion of fate in the story, and explain what effect they had on the outcome for the character to which they refer.
List three examples of hubris, or extreme pride, you see in the story or you hear about happening before the story begins. How does the hubris affect Hector's ultimate fate?
Achilles and Hector are rival warriors, but are they both heroes? Discuss your opinion of each character in terms of the Greek view of arête, or honor, and your own view of it. You may want to look back at your response to Journal 1.6A to assist you in answering the question.
The Iliad is primarily a war epic. In your opinion, is the Iliad condemnation of the brutality of war, a celebration of the heroism that war can inspire, or an evenly developed examination of both of these aspects? Justify your answer with specific examples from the epic and from life. Your answer should be at least five sentences long.
The Legend of Arthur
Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 9 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.7A: Honor and Loyalty

We've read about 4 different heroes from different cultures and time periods (Beowulf, Wilgaf, Gilgamesh, and Achilles). Now that you've read these stories and are going to be reading another story where loyalty and honor play a very important role, I'd like you to do the following:

Consider how Arthur's actions and personality agree with or
challenge your definition of honor. Write a few sentences comparing your definition (from Journal 1.6A) with Arthur's actions and personality.
Write a brief paragraph explaining the importance or unimportance of loyalty in being honorable.
Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 10 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.7B: Combining Sentences

Complete the Practice Activity on page 202 of your text. After completing this activity, read over your Essay Assessment or another journal activity you've completed.

Identify three passages that could be improved by combining two or more sentences with coordinating or subordinating conjunctions. Below the practice activity in your journal, write the original passages and the revised sentences you've created.
Be sure to indicate which journal or writing assignment they came from.
The Canterbury Tales
Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 11 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.9A: Irony in The Canterbury Tales

Irony is where the opposite of what is expected to happen happens or a conflict between what is actually true and what appears to be true. Many of the characters introduced in the prologue are portrayed ironically and Chaucer beautifully describes the inconsistencies between what they should be or could be and what they actually are.

Choose three of the characters introduced in the prologue and explain how Chaucer's description of that character is ironic.
Describe how the characters' true nature is revealed through their characterization including their physical descriptions and what they say. Include in your response a summary of how they are described and an explanation of why that is ironic.
Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 12 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.9B: What Women Want

The Wife of Bath is one of the most recognizable pilgrims. She is a married woman from Bath. Having outlived five husbands (and possibly looking for a sixth on the road to Canterbury) she is witty, intelligent and opinionated. The tale she tells is one of the marriage group, a group of tales that explore what men and women expect from and ought to do in marriage. In the tale, a knight must find the answer to the question:

What do women want? Is it fame? Fortune? Security? I'd like you to make a list or write a paragraph answering this question: What do women want?
Think about what you think women want from men and out of marriage. Then, read the story to see how your answer compares with hers.
Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 13 of 16

Journal Exercise1.9C: The Wife of Bath

Answer the following questions in your journal. Make sure to write your answers in sentence format.

What opinions does the Wife of Bath express in her tale? What do all her opinions-and her tale itself-tell you about her character? You may want to look at your reading notes to answer this question.
Do you think Chaucer's rich portrayal of the Wife of Bath is an indication that he had progressive views about women for his time? Why or why not?
What do men and women each think the other wants most out of life? Out of a relationship? How have attitudes changed since Chaucer's time?

Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 14 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.9D: Vocabulary Development

Part 1: Antonym Map
Create an antonym map, as described on page 144 of your text, for each of the following words: agility, eminent, accrue, arbitrate, benign, guile, obstinate, frugal and duress.

You should illustrate the meaning of the vocabulary words with a description of one of the characters from the "Prologue."
You should also illustrate the meaning of the antonym for the word with a different character from the "Prologue."
Part 2: Etymology
Use a hard-copy dictionary or an online dictionary like (www.dictionary.com) to identify the etymology of and define the following words: ground, shade, account, draw, and vain.

Write both the etymology and the definitions you find in your journal; then use the word in two different sentences to illustrate two different definitions for each word.
Tales From World Literature
Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 15 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.10A: Revisiting the Monster Archetype

Think of monsters you might find in popular stories or movies today. What do they look like? What do they act like? How does he/she feel about other people?

Make a list of 10 characteristics that most villains or modern monsters seem to have in common.
As you read "The Third Voyage of Sinbad the Sailor," think about how the giant in this story is like or unlike other monsters you've studied and heard about in popular culture.
Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 16 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.11A: Late Breaking News

Take one of the basic situations from the ballads and retell it as a cotemporary news story. Like a reporter, be sure to tell what happened, where and when it happened, to whom it happened, why it happened and how it happened. Your response should be at least two paragraphs long.

Lesson 2

Topic Journal
A Flourish of Genius
Lesson 2 Journal Entry # 1 of 13

Journal Exercise 2.1A: Printing Press and the Internet

The invention of the printing press was a major factor in the development of the Renaissance. Because of the printing press, people in Europe were able to read a large variety of printed materials and books. As people's interest in books grew, so did their demand for new types and kinds of books on all different subjects.

In our time, the development of computer and Internet technologies has created an explosion of access to information and a demand for even greater access.
Some people have even speculated that soon printed books will become obsolete and illiteracy will increase.
What do you think? Write a brief essay (2-3 paragraphs) comparing and contrasting these two technological revolutions.
Discuss the impact of each technology on literature and the pursuit of knowledge.
Discuss what role you think the Internet will have in promoting or destroying literacy and what impact it has had on your own life.
Idyllic Life and Carpe Diem!
Lesson 2 Journal Entry # 2 of 13

Journal Exercise 2.2A: Carpe Diem!

The carpe diem philosophy encourages seeking pleasure now because we do not know when we will die. It dates back to the ancient Greek philosopher Epicurus and the Roman poet Horace.

Do you see evidence of this mentality in today's world?
List three examples of a carpe diem philosophy that you see in today's world and then write a brief paragraph explaining whether or not you agree.
Lesson 2 Journal Entry # 3 of 13

Journal Exercise 2.2B: Responding to Literature

Idyllic escape with a loved one still has a strong appeal, whether the retreat be a remote island or a mountaintop hideaway. How is this romantic escape motif used today in literature, television, movies, and advertising? List one example for each category.
The poet John Donne, about whom you will learn more in Lesson 3, wrote "The Bait," a poem that was clearly inspired by Marlowe's "Passionate Shepherd." Read "The Bait" on page 262 in the Elements of Literature. Then, in a brief essay (1-2 paragraphs) discuss whether this poem is an answer to Marlowe's poem, an imitation of it, or neither. You should include at least three specific references to each poem in your response.
Herrick, in "To the Virgins," and Marvell, in "Two His Coy
Mistress," have similar objectives but different approaches. Is one poet more persuasive than the other? How are their arguments both similar and different?
In two or three sentences, explain how the difficult existence
described in "Give Us This Day Our Daily Bread" corresponds to your previous notion of life in the late 1500s. In light of this information, what is surprising or not surprising about the visions of life presented in these four poems?
Shakespeare: Sonnets, Speeches and Songs
Lesson 2 Journal Entry # 4 of 13

Journal Exercise 2.3A: A Timeline of Shakespeare's Life

For this journal you will need to read pages 272-274 in the Elements of Literature: Sixth Course and pages xxiv-xxxii of the Merchant of Venice to learn more about Shakespeare, the man, and his life. Your task is to create a timeline of his life in your journal.

List important events and approximately when they occurred including: birth, marriage, children, death, publications, career highlights and anything else you find interesting or unexpected.
As you learn more about Shakespeare from your other readings, you can add additional dates to your timeline.
Lesson 2 Journal Entry # 5 of 13

Journal Exercise 2.3B: Responding to Literature

Compare "Sonnet 130" by Shakespeare with "Sonnet 23" by Louis Labé. Your comparison should be at least three paragraphs long and should include one paragraph describing the techniques used by Shakespeare, one describing the techniques used by Labé, and one discussing which was more effective and how they are related.
When the singer of "Fear No More" refers to the scepter, learning, and physic in line 11, he is using metonymy. Metonymy is a figure of speech that uses closely related things to substitute for the actual subject, like saying the crown for the king. What professions do the words in line 11 refer to?
Lesson 2 Journal Entry # 6 of 13

Journal Exercise 2.3C: Composing an Original Sonnet

After completing this topic, you will be composing an original sonnet. Using what you've learned about the forms of sonnets, your task is going to be to compose on an original sonnet on a subject of your choice.

Your sonnet should have fourteen lines and follow the rhyme scheme of either a Shakespearean or Petrarchan sonnet.
Your subject matter should be appropriate for the sonnet.
Your poem can be patterned after, or a response to, a sonnet that you've read, but it should include original images and language.
Merchant of Venice Act I
Lesson 2 Journal Entry # 7 of 13

Journal Exercise 2.4: Reader's Notebook

Create a new page in your journal and label it "Merchant of Venice Reader's Notebook." At the end of every topic, you will add to this notebook in each of the following categories.

Your notebook will be submitted as part of your journal at the end of this lesson.
Read the directions below to complete this activity.
Add your entries to this document and label them: Merchant of Venice Reader's Notebook, Act 1.
Assignment 1: Famous phrases

As you are reading, I'd like you to keep a list of phrases or expressions that you recognize from modern language that originate in the Merchant of Venice. I'd like you to find two phrases or words from each Act that are commonly heard in today's conversation

Assignment 2: Character Notebook

In Merchant of Venice, much of what we know about the characters comes from what they say about themselves or from what others say about them. As you are reading the play, I want you to take notes about the following characters: Portia, Antonio, Gratiano, Bassanio, Shylock, and Jessica. For each character I want you to keep track of how others characterize them and how what the characters themselves say reveals about their characters. (For example, are they honest? Are they fair-minded? etc.) You should have notes for each character from each act.

Assignment 3: Improving your vocabulary

As you are reading, I want you to keep a list of new words that you encounter. Try to guess their meanings based upon their context and check your definition with a dictionary after you have finished the Scene. You should have an average of one or two new words for each Scene. At the end of each Act, I'd like you to write a description, summary, or observation about what you've read that uses two of the new words you've learned in that act.

Merchant of Venice Act II
Lesson 2 Journal Entry # 8 of 13

Journal Exercise 2.5A: A Modern Marriage Test

Portia's father established a test for potential suitors to choose her husband. Do you think it is a good test? How would you feel if your husband (or wife) were to be chosen this way?

Write a brief paragraph describing what you think of the test, and then devise your own modern-day test.
Pretend that you are given the task of establishing a test or riddle for potential suitors to pass in order to be able to marry you, your sister, brother, or friend.
What qualities will you be looking for? How will you test these qualities?
Lesson 2 Journal Entry # 9 of 13

Journal Exercise 2.5: Act II Reader's Notebook

Add to your reader's Notebook
Assignment 1: Famous phrases

As you are reading, I'd like you to keep a list of phrases or expressions that you recognize from modern language that originate in the Merchant of Venice. I'd like you to find two phrases or words from each Act that are commonly heard in today's conversation

Assignment 2: Character Notebook

In Merchant of Venice, much of what we know about the characters comes from what they say about themselves or from what others say about them. As you are reading the play, I want you to take notes about the following characters: Portia, Antonio, Gratiano, Bassanio, Shylock, and Jessica. For each character I want you to keep track of how others characterize them and how what the characters themselves say reveals about their characters. (For example, are they honest? Are they fair-minded? etc.) You should have notes for each character from each act.

Assignment 3: Improving your vocabulary

As you are reading, I want you to keep a list of new words that you encounter. Try to guess their meanings based upon their context and check your definition with a dictionary after you have finished the Scene. You should have an average of one or two new words for each Scene. At the end of each Act, I'd like you to write a description, summary, or observation about what you've read that uses two of the new words you've learned in that act.
Merchant of Venice Act III
Lesson 2 Journal Entry # 10 of 13

Journal Exercise 2.6A: Responding to Literature

In Elizabethan times, the friendship relationship was as important, if not more important, than the romantic love relationship. What examples of the importance of friendship are evident in this Act? Who acts as, or tries to act as, a good friend to whom? List at least three examples of friendship and explain their importance.
Go back and read Shylock's famous speech in Act III, Scene 1, lines 52-72. What did you learn about Shylock from his speech? Did you feel more or less sympathetic to him after this speech? Why or why not? Write a paragraph explaining your feelings.
Act III, Scene 2 contains a song that begins "Tell me where is thy fancy bred." What purpose does the song play in the Act? What is the tone of the song? How does it compare with what's going on while it's being sung, and what happens after? Answer these questions in a brief paragraph.
Add to your Reader's Notebook for Act III

Assignment 1: Famous phrases

As you are reading, I'd like you to keep a list of phrases or expressions that you recognize from modern language that originate in the Merchant of Venice. I'd like you to find two phrases or words from each Act that are commonly heard in today's conversation.

Assignment 2: Character Notebook

In Merchant of Venice, much of what we know about the characters comes from what they say about themselves or from what others say about them. As you are reading the play, I want you to take notes about the following characters: Portia, Antonio, Gratiano, Bassanio, Shylock, and Jessica. For each character I want you to keep track of how others characterize them and how what the characters themselves say reveals about their characters. (For example, are they honest? Are they fair-minded? etc.) You should have notes for each character from each act.

Assignment 3: Improving your vocabulary

As you are reading, I want you to keep a list of new words that you encounter. Try to guess their meanings based upon their context and check your definition with a dictionary after you have finished the Scene. You should have an average of one or two new words for each Scene. At the end of each Act, I'd like you to write a description, summary, or observation about what you've read that uses two of the new words you've learned in that act.
Merchant of Venice Act IV
Lesson 2 Journal Entry # 11 of 13

Journal Exercise 2.7A: Responding to Literature

Do you think Shylock got what he deserved, or do you think he was dramatically wronged? Was he a victim of anti-Semitism or a rightfully punished villain, or both? Defend your answer with at least a three paragraph essay.
The ties that bind people together, namely the bonds of usury, the bonds of friendship and the obligations of mercy are discussed in different places throughout the play. Compare the discussion of usury in Act 1, Scene 3; the discussion of friendship in Act III, Scene 2; and the pleas for mercy in Act IV, Scene 1. Which of these issues do you think is the most important in the play? Support your answer with specific quotes and examples from the text. You should write a three to five paragraph essay answering this question.
Add to your Reader's Notebook for Act IV
Assignment 1: Famous phrases

As you are reading, I'd like you to keep a list of phrases or expressions that you recognize from modern language that originate in the Merchant of Venice. I'd like you to find two phrases or words from each Act that are commonly heard in today's conversation.

Assignment 2: Character Notebook

In Merchant of Venice, much of what we know about the characters comes from what they say about themselves or from what others say about them. As you are reading the play, I want you to take notes about the following characters: Portia, Antonio, Gratiano, Bassanio, Shylock, and Jessica. For each character I want you to keep track of how others characterize them and how what the characters themselves say reveals about their characters. (For example, are they honest? Are they fair-minded? etc.) You should have notes for each character from each act.

Assignment 3: Improving your vocabulary

As you are reading, I want you to keep a list of new words that you encounter. Try to guess their meanings based upon their context and check your definition with a dictionary after you have finished the Scene. You should have an average of one or two new words for each Scene. At the end of each Act, I'd like you to write a description, summary, or observation about what you've read that uses two of the new words you've learned in that act.
Merchant of Venice Act V
Lesson 2 Journal Entry # 12 of 13

Journal Exercise 2.8A: Responding to Literature

Diagram the action of the play and explain what happens in the:
A. Exposition
B. Rising Action
C. Climax
D. Resolution
Define each of the components generally and explain what happens during each part. Then, describe specific events that occur during each part of the action in Merchant of Venice.

Although the Merchant of Venice tackles some very serious subjects, it is a romantic comedy and, as such, has numerous comedic elements. As you are reading take note of things or people that make you laugh and then ask yourself why. I'd like you to list two examples for each of the comedic elements below.
Physical humor:
Confusion:
Other type:


Racism and prejudice are major themes in the Merchant of Venice. Many of the prejudices in the play reflect the prejudices of Shakespeare's time and experience. Some critics argue that Shylock is one of Shakespeare's most villainous characters; others argue that he is simply the victim of prejudice and anti-Semitism. Who do you most agree with? Write an essay arguing that Shylock is either a victim or a villain. Use at least two specific examples or quotes from Acts I-V to support your arguments. Include in your essay a discussion of what, if any, prejudices Shylock has himself and how they affect his character.
Poet Samuel Coleridge has said that the characters in this play are a "representation of men in all ages and all times." What are the timeless elements you see in this play? What themes or characters are still relevant in today's world? List three or four things you believe are still relevant and explain how they still apply.
Add to your Reader's Notebook. Label your entries for this topic "Reader's Notebook, Act V"

Assignment 1: Famous phrases

As you are reading, I'd like you to keep a list of phrases orexpressions that you recognize from modern language that originate inthe Merchant of Venice. I'd like you to find two phrases or words fromeach Act that are commonly heard in today's conversation

Assignment 2: Character Notebook

In Merchant of Venice, much of what we know about the characters comesfrom what they say about themselves or from what others say aboutthem. As you are reading the play, I want you to take notes about thefollowing characters: Portia, Antonio, Gratiano, Bassanio, Shylock,and Jessica. For each character I want you to keep track of how otherscharacterize them and how what the characters themselves say revealsabout their characters. (For example, are they honest? Are they
fair-minded? etc.) You should have notes for each character from eachact.

Assignment 3: Improving your vocabulary

As you are reading, I want you to keep a list of new words that youencounter. Try to guess their meanings based upon their context andcheck your definition with a dictionary after you have finished theScene. You should have an average of one or two new words for each Scene. At the end of each Act, I'd like you to write a description,summary, or observation about what you've read that uses two of thenew words you've learned in that act.

Epigrams
Lesson 2 Journal Entry # 13 of 13

Journal Exercise 2.9A: Responding to Literature

In "On My First Son" Jonson resolves never to love again as strongly because his loss is so unbearable. What do you think of his resolution? What effect could a vow like that have on someone? Write a letter to Jonson explaining what you think of his vow. Your letter should be at least three paragraphs long.
Compose a brief epigram on a topic of your choice. Possible topics include love, hate, friendship, relationships, travel, etc. Your epigram should be at least two lines long.

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