Franklin Delano Roosevelt Essays and Research Papers

Instructions for Franklin Delano Roosevelt College Essay Examples

Title: African American History

  • Total Pages: 2
  • Words: 540
  • Sources:0
  • Citation Style: APA
  • Document Type: Essay
Essay Instructions: Answer each of the following questions with a one-page essay meeting the requirements of APA format. If used, properly cite your sources.

1. Was President Franklin Delano Roosevelt really a “friend” to African Americans? Why or why not?

2. Was the March on Washington Movement really a success? Why?

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Title: Disability

  • Total Pages: 5
  • Words: 1759
  • References:0
  • Citation Style: MLA
  • Document Type: Research Paper
Essay Instructions: This has to be a Research Brief. It must answer these questions
1) What is the ADA (American with Disabilities Act) and why is it important?
2) What is the disability rights movement?
3) What types of issues are important to disability rights activists?

The brief must have a source
1) That explains the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act)
2) A website about the history of the disability rights movement.
3) A source about Franklin Delano Roosevelt's disability
4) A source about the Jerry Lewis MDA Telethon
5) A source about disablility rights activists that protest the Jerry Lewis Telethon
Also, The bibiography has to be annotated!

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References:

This National Park Service Web site proves information about Franklin D. Roosevelt, including his struggle with physical disability.

Jerry Lewis: Muscular Dystrophy Association. Retrieved September 16, 2005 from http://www.mdausa.org/telethon/

This is the official Web site for the Jerry Lewis Muscular Dystrophy Association Labor Day Telethon. The site provides information concerning the disease as well as the telethon information.

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Title: Roosevelt - background

  • Total Pages: 2
  • Words: 547
  • Works Cited:3
  • Citation Style: APA
  • Document Type: Essay
Essay Instructions: Sources:
1. The Era of Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1933-1945: A Brief History With Documents by Richard Polenberg - - 4 Polenberg quotes , use brackets to quote i.e [polenberg, page number]

2.Franklin Delano Roosevelt by Alan Brinkley- 4 quotes and use brackets [Brinkley,page number]

3. Franklin d Roosevelt DVD - 2 quotes use brackets [dvd]- http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/films/fdr/player/


Prompt is :
FDR is always listed in the top 5 greatest american president. Brinkley calls him "the most important leader in of th 20th century "

Why? Because of his achievements as she guided the nation the 2 of the greatest crises: great depression and world war 2.
he succeed largely because he was a creative leader with strong political gifts who skillfully applied both to his challenges.

In your essay describe first how how FDR's political gifts as they are revealed in his election victories, his congressional achievements and his dealings with the other world leaders. Then show his creative leadership in both domestic and foreign affairs including war.Finally in your conclusion justify the judgement that FDR left the nation "a ...better place than it had been before"

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Roosevelt acknowledged the suffering the war could inflict on the American peoples and thus concentrated on strategies that could put the nation at an advantage. "Unknown to all but a few, the United States was by then far along in an effort Roosevelt had authorized early in the war: the Manhattan Project." (Brinkley 1946) The project involving the atomic bomb was practically a means to use a limited number of soldiers while dealing a blow that could destabilize the enemy.

The fact that Roosevelt was determined to keep the U.S. out of the war is visible when looking at his early reactions concerning the conflict. "When war finally broke in Europe in September 1939, Roosevelt continued to insist that the conflict would not involve the United States." (Brinkley 1928) Even with this, he did not hesitate to get the military to organize better with the purpose of being able to provide a swift response in case of a disaster.

All things considered, Roosevelt played an essential role in U.S. history and it is safe to say that his involvement both in the Great Depression and in the Second World War made it possible for Americans in particular and for the world in general to experience a more rapid recovery and to escape having to suffer for prolonged periods of time.

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Title: The attacks on Pearl Harbor and the World Trade Center had similar historical events surrounding each attack Franklin Delano Roosevelt and George W Bush used similar policies to combat further attacks and unite the nation

  • Total Pages: 27
  • Words: 8509
  • Bibliography:0
  • Citation Style: MLA
  • Document Type: Research Paper
Essay Instructions: The thesis statement is - "The attacks on Pearl Harbor and the World Trade Center had similar historical events surrounding each attack. Franklin Delano Roosevelt and George W. Bush used similar policies to bat further attacks and unite the nation."
How they brought the nation together, spending on military increases, declaring war with almost full congressional approval, the similarities in the times, economy, etc. One difference though are the differences in war against a nation-state and war against a tactic/terrorist organization are very different and should be elaborated on as well as the similarities in policies.
The paper should be 25 pages long with a 2 page summary or detailed outline of the paper. Total - 27 pages. Works cited or the Chicago Style Manual equivalent as well.
I have already found these references and put them in an annotated bibliography. Please use them in the paper as well as others that you may find.


BIBLIOGRAPHY


Borch, Fred L. ?Comparing Pearl Harbor and ?9/11": Intelligence Failure? American Unpreparedness? Military Responsibility?? The Journal of Military History 67, (2003). Intelligence failure and unpreparedness were both key problems with Pearl Harbor and 9/11 but were extremely different in terms of failure to prevent (9/11) and failure to provide an adequate defense (Pearl Harbor).

Congressional Research Service. FBI Intelligence Reform Since September 11, 2001: Issues and Options for Congress. RL32336, August 4, 2004. A report on legislation leading up to the national intelligence reform bill.

Congressional Research Service. Initial Federal Budget Response to 1941 Attack on Pearl Harbor. RS21010, September 13, 2001. A brief description and summary of appropriations bills and testimony during legislative debate.

Department of State. Peace and War, United States Foreign Policy, 1931-1941. (Washington, D.C.: GPO, 1943). Describes the policies and mind set used by the State Department when dealing with foreign countries.

Epstein, Edward. ?9/11 Probe Eerily Similar to Pearl Harbor Inquiry/ An Earlier Look Into How America Was Caught Napping,? San Francisco Chronicle. April 28, 2004. After both tragedies major bureaucratic changes were implemented, Defense Department in 1947 creation and the Department of Homeland Security in 2002.

Hart Commission, Joint Committee on the Investigation of the Pearl Harbor Attack. Pearl Harbor Attack. (Washington, D.C.: GPO, 1944) 1-5560, February 12, - June 15, 1944. Original documents of statements and witness testimony before Senate and House joint hearings.

Henderson, Phillip G. ?Intelligence Failures of 9/11: What the Lessons of History Show,? The World and I. December Issue 2001. Describes the problems of misperception, ineffective coordination and bureaucratic infighting that contributed to the lapses in the intelligence munity while drawing on parallels with Pearl Harbor and the Cuban Missile Crisis.

National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States. The 9/11 Commission
Report. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 2004. A full and plete account of the activities surround and leading up to 9/11, including preparedness for and response to the attacks.

Podhoretz, John. ?No One Knew Enough,? New York Post. May 18, 2002. Parallels Pearl Harbor and 9/11 and the inability of government officials to collaborate separate intelligence agency information.

U.S. Congress Joint Committee on Pearl Harbor Attack; Hearings, Part 24, pp. 1749-56 (Washington, D.C.: GPO, 1941). Original documents of statements and witness testimony before Senate and House joint hearings.

Roberts Commission, Joint Committee on the Investigation of the Pearl Harbor Attack. Attack Upon Pearl Harbor by Japanese Armed Forces. No. 159, S. Docs., 77-2, VOL. 8 - 8, (Washington, D.C.: GPO, 1941). Original documents of statements and witness testimony before Senate and House joint hearings.

Safford, Captain Laurance F., U.S. National Archives. SRH?149, A Brief History of Communications Intelligence in the United States. (Washington, D.C.: GPO, 1952). A declassified account about by a Navy captain brings diverse documents of cooperation and coordination to the forefront of the Pearl Harbor attacks.

Sisk, Richard. ?9/11 Furor Echoes ?41 Military Brass Targeted Over Pearl Harbor Hit,? Daily News Washington Bureau. May 19, 2002. Article tracing the warnings of imminent attack for both events.

Woodard, Calvin. ?Studying the Warning Signs Questions on 9/11 Strikingly Similar to Post-WWII Report,? The Associated Press. April 5, 2004. Outlines imaginative thinking, obvious clues, broken munications, and scattered intelligence as similar to both disastrous situations.

If you have any questions, PLEASE contact me at . I really need this to be good so I can use it as an amazing source for my actual final paper. Thank you.

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Bibliography:

Bibliography

1) Achcar, Gilbert. The Clash of Barbarisms: September 11 and the Making of the New World Disorder. New York: Monthly Review Press, 2002.

2) Bradley, James, and Ron Powers. Flags of our fathers. New York: Bantam Books. 2000.

3)Boulden, Jane, and Thomas George Weiss. Terrorism and the UN: Before and After September 11. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2004

4)Crotty, William J. The Politics of Terror: The U.S. Response to 9/11. Boston: Northeastern University Press, 2004.

5)Chomsky, Noam. 9-11. New York: Seven Stories Press. 2002.

6)Congressional Research Service. FBI Intelligence Reform Since September 11, 2001: Issues and Options for Congress. RL32336, August 4, 2004.

7)Congressional Research Service. Initial Federal Budget Response to 1941 Attack on Pearl Harbor. RS21010, September 13, 2001.

8)Coll, Steve. Ghost Wars: the Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan and bin Laden, from the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001. New York, Penguin Press, 2004. 695

9)Department of State. Peace and War, United States Foreign Policy, 1931-1941. Washington, D.C.: GPO, 1943.

10)Dingman, Roger. Reflections on Pearl Harbor Anniversaries Past. The Journal of American-East Asian Relations 3(3):279-293. 1994.

11)Epstein, Edward. 9/11 Probe Eerily Similar to Pearl Harbor Inquiry / An Earlier Look Into How America Was Caught Napping. San Francisco Chronicle. April 28, 2004.

12)Griffin, David Ray. The New Pearl Harbor: Disturbing Questions About the Bush Administration and 9/11. Northampton, MA: Olive Branch Press, 2004.

13)Gregory, Shaun. France and the War on Terrorism. Terrorism and Political Violence 15:124-147 Spring 2003.

14)Hart Commission, Joint Committee on the Investigation of the Pearl Harbor Attack. Pearl Harbor Attack. Washington, D.C.: GPO, 1944. 1-5560, February 12,- June 15, 1944.

15)Henderson, Phillip G. Intelligence Failures of 9/11: What the Lessons of History Show. The World and I. December Issue 2001.

16)Henderson, Harry. Global Terrorism. New York, Facts on File, 2004. 316

17)Lifton, Robert Jay and Greg Mitchell. Hiroshima in America: Fifty Years of Denial. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons. 1995.

18)Linenthal, Edward, and Tom Engelhardt, eds. History Wars: The 'Enola Gay' and Other Battles for the American Past. New York: Henry Holt and Co. 1996.

19)Linenthal, Edward T. Sacred Ground: Americans and Their Battlegrounds. Rev. ed. Urbana: University of Illinois Press. 1993.

20)Marling, Karal Ann, and John Wetenhall. Iwo Jima: Monuments, Memories, and the American Hero. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Un iversity Press. 1991.

21)Moeller, Susan D. Shooting War: Photography and the American Experience of Combat. New York: Basic Books. 1989.

22)Neisser, Ulric. Memory Observed: Remembering in Natural Contexts. San Francisco: W.H. Freeman. 1982.

23)National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States. The 9/11 Commission Report. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 2004.

24)Podhoretz, John. No One Knew Enough. New York Post. May 18, 2002.

25)Pearlstein, Richard M. Fatal Future?: Transnational Terrorism and the New Global Disorder. 1st ed. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2004.

26)Roberts Commission, Joint Committee on the Investigation of the Pearl Harbor Attack. Attack Upon Pearl Harbor by Japanese Armed Forces. No. 159, S. Docs., 77-2, VOL. 8-8, Washington, D.C.: GPO, 1941.

27)Rosen, Jeffrey. The Naked Crowd: Reclaiming Security and Freedom in an Anxious Age. 1st ed. New York: Random House, 2004.

28)Said, Edward W. From Oslo to Iraq and the Road Map. New York: Pantheon Books, 2004.

29)Slackman, Michael. Remembering Pearl Harbor: The Story of the U.S.S. Arizona Memorial. Honolulu: Arizona Memorial Museum Association. 1986.

30)Sturken, Marita. Tangled Memories: The Vietnam War, the AIDS Epidemic, and the Politics of Remembering. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. 1997.

31)Sisk, Richard. 9/11 Furor Echoes '41 Military Brass Targeted Over Pearl Harbor Hit. Daily News Washington Bureau. May 19, 2002.

32)Safford, Captain Laurance F., U.S. National Archives. SRH -- "149, A Brief History of Communications Intelligence in the United States. Washington, D.C.: GPO, 1952.

33)Terkel, Studs. The Good War: An Oral History of World War II. New York: Pantheon Books. 1984.

34)U.S. Congress Joint Committee on Pearl Harbor Attack; Hearings, Part 24, pp. 1749-56 Washington, D.C.: GPO, 1941.

35)White, Geoffrey M. Mythic History and National Memory: The Pearl Harbor Anniversary. Culture and Psychology, Special Issue edited by James Wertsch 3(1):63-88. 1997.

36)Woodard, Calvin. Studying the Warning Signs Questions on 9/11 Strikingly Similar to Post-WWII Report. The Associated Press. April 5, 2004.

37)Whittaker, David J. Terrorists and Terrorism in the Contemporary World. New York, Routledge, 2004. 172

The attacks on Pearl Harbor and the World Trade Center

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