A Poison Tree Essays and Research Papers

Instructions for A Poison Tree College Essay Examples

Title: A poison tree

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Essay Instructions: http://quotations.about.com/cs/poemlyrics/a/A_Poison_Tree.htm
(A Poison Tree By William Blake


this is a analysis essay. don't use any sources just use your own Interpretation.the following pages that I'm faxing you help you to get what I'm looking for.
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Title: EXPLICATION OF POEM

  • Total Pages: 2
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  • Citation Style: MLA
  • Document Type: Research Paper
Essay Instructions: HELLO,
MY NAME IS CARRIE AND I AM IN NEED OF YOUR SERVICES. EVERY THING THAT I NEED FOR MY PAPER IS WRITTEN BELOW. I AM NOT SURE HOW MANY SOURSE I NEED SO FEEL FREE TO TO ADD A FEW. THE EXPLICATION IS ABOUT WILLIAM BLAKES " A POISON TREE " POEM. PLEASE LET ME KNOW IF THIS CAN BE DONE BY THE DUE DATE AND WITH THE SPECIFICATIONS STATED BELOW.
THANKS

PLEASE NOTE I HAVE A IMAC WITHOUT WORD ON IT SO PLEASE LET ME KNOW IF I NEED ANOTHER PROGRAM DOWNLOAD TO VIEW.

The first of your major essay assignments is an explication of a poem from the Romantic period. Confine your choices to the poems on the reading list.

Explication of a Poem

Poetry intimidates many readers because they are convinced it is more difficult to understand than other types of literature. However, once one realizes that poetry, despite its different appearance on the page, is also written in sentences that can be analyzed and understood, it is easy to begin to enjoy its richness of form and meaning.

The Writing Center at the University of North Carolina describes an explication of a poem as "a relatively short analysis which describes the possible meanings and relationships of the words, images, and other small units that make up a poem. Writing an explication is an effective way for a reader to connect a poem's plot and conflicts with its structural features (See the entire handout by clicking here).

The verb explicate means to "set forth" or to "unfold." To "unfold" or analyze a poem, one must explain and comment on each line by showing how all of the poetic devices work together to produce the meaning and the effect of the work. To that end, an explication is much more than a paraphrase of each line; it is a discussion of how such elements as rhyme, rhythm, word choice, figurative language, and tone make the work effective. The explication also concerns the ways in which the parts of the poem come together to make meaning.

The poem's meaning or theme is the insight or ideas about life that the author wants to share. An effective work makes the reader think about life, for the author wants usus to consider his insights into our common experiences. Themes are not morals designed to teach usus how to conduct our lives; they are ideas that make usus think about life and about our values, and anytime we evaluate our own philosophy of life, we become more aware of who we are and of what life means.

The author shares the theme through the subject of the work, trough what is said about the subject, and through the poet's use of poetic devices. This message about life is a idea, an insight that the poet has had an wants to share with the reader. Whether accepted or rejected, the theme has enlarged the readers' minds by making them evaluate the poet's idea and its place in our value system. Any time we think critically about an experience or an idea, we become more sensitive and thoughtful human beings.

The Assignment -

Write an explication of a poem from the Romantics section of the reading list. Your paper should be approximately 2 pages long in proper MLA format. (See your Gardner text if you have any questions about essay format.) You may, but are not required to use secondary sources. If you use secondary sources, document them properly according to MLA format as described in and Gardner, Writing about Literature. Review the sectionin Gardner about "Writing about Poems" (although the sample essay on Sonnet 116 is not particularly good.) The essay is due on Feb 23.

Use MS Word to write your essay. Upload the essay to the assignment drop box. (Be aware that the assignment closes after you upload a file to the drop box.) Make sure the poem you've selected is on the reading list for this course. If you select a poem from the textbook or elsewhere that is not on the reading list, your essay will not be graded.

When preparing to write an essay which explicates a poem, keep these steps in mind:

Begin by reading the poem a sentence at a time, making sure that you understand the meaning of each word. (Notice that I did not say a line at a time because sentences in poetry may end in the middle of a line.) Poets choose each word carefully, depending on both denotative and connotative meaning. The denotation can be found in the dictionary, but since some words may have several meanings -- some now obsolete ? be sure to choose the meaning that is appropriate to the context in the sentence. The connotation relates to the emotions that the word may evoke because of our past experiences.

Think about the poem's meaning. Determine the rhetorical situation (also known as the dramatic situation). In brief, who is the speaker, to whom is the poem addressed, and what is its purpose? (Remember that the speaker and the poet are not the same. Avoid the false assumption that all poems are personal expressions by the poet.) Then also consider

What is the scene in the poem? Determine the themes and conflicts that the poem addresses and questions it raises.

Who is the speaker (also called the voice or persona) in the poem?. Who does the poem address? Who are the characters in the poem? What motivates the speaker?

What is the plot (what happens in the poem on its surface)? Does conflict occur? How is it resolved?

What is the significance of the time and place the action occurs and is reported?

Once you understand the meaning of the poem, read it again to identify words that rhyme or that contain alliteration, assonance, or consonance. Mark any examples of similes, metaphors, or symbols, and note any images and the sensory impressions that they convey. Note unusual word orders, vocabulary, sound devices, imagery, and other stylistic devices. Also decide on the tone of the work based on the subject, the word choice and order, and the poet?s overall style. Determine patterns and how they convey meaning and contribute to the success of the poem. (The explication should not just be a line by line paraphrase or description of the poem, but it should show how each line contributes to the meaning.

Essay Organization
Introduction
After an interesting lead or ?hook,? the introduction should include the following:
the author?s full name and the title of the poem
the type of poem ? narrative, lyric, dramatic monologue, etc.
the voice of the poem ? the narrator, the speaker, or an identifiable character.
the setting in time an place if it is stated or can be inferred from the text
a brief summary of what the poem is about.
your thesis statement. The thesis statement should reveal in general the discoveries you made about the poet?s use of specific poetic devices and a statement of the poem's theme.
Body
elaborate on the larger issues such as the significance of the poem's form, type, etc. that you may have mentioned in the introducion.
explain what motivates the speaker, how the conflicts are resolved, their relationships to theme
discuss the stanzas, explaining the meaning of each sentence/line by paraphrasing and quoting and by pointing out and explaining the effects of any poetic devices that the poet employs. Remember that each sentence/line of the poem must be explained because each one contributes to the total effect of the work; you may, however, explicate sentence/line four before sentence/line three, for example, if that approach would help clarify the poem?s meaning. Your discussion must elaborate on how your analysis on the line supports the thesis.
discuss formal poetic elements that contribute to the meaning and understanding of the poem. (All poems have a metrical pattern, but it might not have particular significance for every poem. )
Break the discussion into paragraphs at logical points. (DO NOT assume that a 5 paragraph format essay will satisfy). Use transitions to make connections between the paragraphs.)
Conclusion
The conclusion should comment on the poet?s effective (or not) use of poetic devices to convey his or her meaning and then discuss that meaning as it relates to the universal human experience.

Save your essay as yourlastnamefirstinitialE1. For example, if your name is Harry Potter, your file would be named potterhE1.doc. (MSWord will add the .doc file ending.Be sure there are no spaces in your file name.)

Editing
Discuss literature in present tense
Maintain a 3rd person point of view focusing on the work (Avoid inserting "the reader" into your essay since you are the only reader for whom you can speak.)
Consult Gardner, Writing about LIterature or one of the suggested websites for specifics in quoting and citing poetry and for details of MLA format.

Click on Assignments under the Action Menu for Essay 1. Select Essay 1, upload your paper to to student files and click on Submit to turn it in. ( Use Blackboard's HELP menu for assistance in uploading and submitting the file.) If your file "gets lost" and does not reach me, it essay is not turned in. If the essay is submitted in formats other than MS Word (.doc), it will not be accepted.
Some university websites that offer information of explications:

"Writing about Poetry" from The OWL at Purdue
"Reading Poetry" from the University of Wisconsin-Madison
"Poetry Explications" from University of North Carolina
"Poetry Explication" from the Writing Studio at Duke University
"Writing about Poetry" from Texas A&M Writing Center
"Responding to Poetry: Explication of a Poem" Bryn Mawr College
Excerpt From Essay:
Bibliography:


Blake, William. "A Poison Tree." The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Vol. II. Abrams,

M.H., Ed. New York W.W. Norton and Company. 1986. Print.

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Title: WORLD LITERATURE

  • Total Pages: 20
  • Words: 5946
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  • Citation Style: APA
  • Document Type: Essay
Essay Instructions: I need (20) twenty-page essay on the World Literature course.
There are fifteen separate questions that need to be answered thoroughly.
You will need to use about 1 to 2 pages depending on question.
I'll include the literature textbook materials.


1) Modern Day Poets

Wordsworth and the Romantics saw a very special place for the poet-in a role similar to priest, teacher, or master. In the Romantic view, the poet functions as a sort of spiritual guide to the inner realm of intuition, feeling, and imagination.
• Do people see poets and artists in that light today, or are they viewed and valued differently?
• What role do artists and poets play in our society today?
• Write a brief description of the role they play now and also indicate what role you think they should play.
• Your answer should be two paragraphs long.



2) Speaking Out Against Injustice (Read pages 542-543)

Blake uses his poetry to argue against social injustice. Two of his poems, both titled "The Chimney Sweeper," critique the life of poor children who were forced into this profession. This work was very dangerous and difficult. The children were very badly treated by masters who only cared about money.
• If you could cry out against an evil of our day-and get people to listen-which social injustice would you protest?
• Choose one and explain why. Discuss the methods you would use to protest and then choose one of them and write a brief protest.
• If you'd like, you can write your response in the form of a poem or song.




3) Responding to Literature (Read pages 542-543, 534-539)

1. Why do human beings commit evil? Why does God allow the innocent to suffer? These questions profoundly disturbed Blake. One of his early conclusions about the problems of good and evil is that "Without contraries, there is no progression." How do "The Tyger" and "The Lamb" reflect what Blake called "two contrary states of human experience"? Do you think that Blake's assessment is correct? Do you believe these contrary states are essential to human existence? Why or why not? What examples of this belief do you see in each of his poems? Your answer should be 1-2 paragraphs long.
2. How do you think the voice of "The Lamb" is different from the voice of the speaker in "The Tyger"? Why do you think the questions in "The Lamb" get answers? What imagery suggests that the tiger could be a force of enlightenment? Of revolutionary violence? Answer these questions in a paragraph.
3. What do you see as the theme of "A Poison Tree"? Use specific details from the poem to support your answer. Your answer should be at least three sentences long.
4. How would you describe the tone of each of the poems entitled "The Chimney Sweeper"? Use specific examples from each poem to support your answer.
5. If you had to choose your own symbols for the qualities represented by Blake's tiger and lamb, what would they be?
Explain your reasoning in a brief paragraph.




4) Appreciating Nature: Wordsworth (Read pages 552-557, 559-562)

a) "Lines Composed a few Miles Above Tintern Abbey"
* As you are re-reading "Lines Composed a few Miles Above Tintern Abbey" look for the end punctuation and then indents that signal the end of one stanza and the beginning of the next. Identify the number of stanzas in the poem. As you read, also make notes about how Wordsworth uses the stanzas to organize his ideas.
* Write a brief essay discussing whether or not you think the pattern of organization used by Wordsworth is effective in achieving his tone in "Lines Composed a few Miles Above Tintern Abbey." First, identify the tone of the poem, and then discuss and least three unique organizational patterns that either contribute to or detract from that tone. Your answer should be at least three paragraphs long.

b) "Composed upon a Westminster Bridge"
* What details of "Composed upon Westminster Bridge"
personify the city? List at least three examples from the poem.
* List two influences of the Romantic movement evident in the poem and explain why they are Romantic.
* Write a description of a city or town you know well. Use
personification to characterize your city or town. If you wish, you can begin your descriptions with Wordsworth's first line, "Earth has not anything to show more fair."



c) "The World Is Too Much with UsUs"
* What is Wordsworth's purpose in alluding to mythology in the last lines of the poem? What emotions do these allusions evoke?
* How are the ideas about materialism and progress in this poem relevant to today's world? What is your reaction to the speaker's attack on modern life? Do you agree with Wordsworth that, if people were in tune with nature, they would be happier and less materialistic? Write a paragraph explaining your answers to these questions.




5) Rebellious Spirit: Lord Byron (Read pages 609-614)

Imagine that the dark beauty described by Byron reads this poem and discovers that it was written about her. Write a letter from the woman to Byron expressing what you think of the poem's portrayal of you. Are you flattered? Embarrassed? Outraged? Do you think the poem reveals the real you? In your letter quote specific lines from the poem and respond to them directly. Your letter should be at least three paragraphs long. You may write your letter in the form of a poem if you wish.

1. Byron's verse form in Childe Harold's Pilgrimage is the
Spenserian stanza. How closely does stanza 2 adhere to the rhyme and rhythm of that form. What purpose does the
alexandrine fulfill?

2. In stanzas 2 and 3 of Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, the speaker uses an apostrophe to address the sea. Write a prose apostrophe to some element of nature-sea, wind, fire, snow, thunderstorm, hail, etc. Use stanzas 2 and 3 as a model for your apostrophe. Make sure to frame your apostrophe so that you are directly addressing an element of nature. Your apostrophe should be a paragraph long (4-5 sentences).



6) Legacy Through Writing

All human beings and all beauty must perish, but can't our works survive usus? Death is inevitable, but isn't what we leave behind proof that our passage through life mattered? Like the poets of another restless age, the Renaissance, the Romantic poets tried to answer these questions.

• How would you answer them?
• Discuss whether and how human beings can achieve immortality through their words or their work. If not through a creative process, then what can offer humans immortality?



7) Percy Bysshe Shelley (Read pages 621-625, 275-277)

Answer the following questions:

• Each section of "Ode to a Western Wind" is a sonnet. Review the sonnet forms on pages 275-277 of your text and describe how Shelly has adapted the sonnet form to meet his needs.
• Do Shelly's sonnets have turns? Why do you think he chose to use the form of sonnets that he did? Your answer should be at least two paragraphs long.



8) John Keats (Read pages 640-643, 646-649, 651-653)

1. Select one of Keats' two sonnets and paraphrase it, line by line, using your own words. Remember, in the paraphrase you should put inverted sentences in standard word order. You should also rephrase the figures of speech to make it clear that you understand them. Sometimes poets omit words; if that is the case in one these sonnets, be sure to supply the missing words. Page 644 provides an example, paraphrasing the first lines of "When I Have Fears." Notice that paraphrasing is often longer and less interesting than the original, but through paraphrasing you can understand the poem better.

2. Identify an example of synesthesia in stanza 2 of "Ode to a
Nightingale." What sensory experience does it describe? What feeling or mood does the device help to create? How does the speaker's mood change from the beginning to the end of "Ode to a Nightingale"? What language or poetic devices does the author demonstrate the change in mood?

3. Essay: You've now read three different odes-two by Keats and one, now, by Shelley. For this essay, you will choose two of the odes and compare them. Compare their subject matters, their forms, tones, themes and the poetic devices used by the authors. Discuss the effectiveness of these elements, and discuss which ode you feel is the best example of what an ode should be. Your essay should be three paragraphs long and should include an introductory and a conclusion paragraph.






9) Reading Activities for Mariner (Read pages 578-602)

As you are reading, keep a list of archaic words that are still in use today. Also, if you encounter words you do not know the meaning of as you are reading, I'd like you to guess at the meaning and write down your guess at the meaning. After finishing a stanza or two, check your guesses with the definitions in the margins or another dictionary. You should have a list of at least seven words after you are finished reading.

Part 2: As you are reading Rime of the Ancient Mariner, I also want you to keep track of what happens in a timeline. Your timeline should begin with "The ancient Mariner stops the Wedding Guest and begins to tell the story" and end with "The Wedding Guest leaves sadder and wiser." While you read and plot your timeline, add to your chart your responses to his story. When do you feel sympathy for him-or sorrow or fear? When does his story seem true, and when is it hopelessly distorted by guilt?




10) Responding to Literature (Read pages 573-576)

1. The power of the imagination is often exalted in Romantic poetry. In your opinion, does "Kubla Khan" celebrate the imagination or caution against its indulgence? Support your response with at least two examples from the poem.
2. As you will remember from Lesson 3, an allegory is a narrative in which the characters, settings, and actions are symbolic-they have both literal and figurative meaning. Write a brief essay (2-3 paragraphs) describing what the various elements (the ancient Mariner, the wedding, the ship, and the albatross) symbolize and what moral lesson Coleridge is attempting to teach.
3. For the most part, the form of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner is written in a regular ballad stanza. Occasionally, however, Coleridge varies the meter of the lines and the length of the stanza. Choose one of these variations and explain how it differs from a regular one. Be sure to indicate the line number(s) you are referring to. What effect do you think the changes have on the poem?
4. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner is famous for its use of vivid figurative language and memorable sound devices. Find in the poem a striking example of each of the following: simile, metaphor, personification, alliteration, assonance, and internal rhyme. Then discuss what effect these elements have on the overall effect of the ballad.




11) The Themes in Frankenstein

Directions: I want you to take a moment and think of examples in your life today of the themes listed below. For instance, do you see any examples in your life of beautiful things being more highly valued than less attractive or ugly things; or, can you think of any examples of things that appear differently from what they really are? In this assignment, comment on each of the following themes in your journal and discuss what place or role they have in our cultural perspective today. Which of the themes are valued as being beneficial and or admirable and which are not:
• Beauty and Ugliness
• Love
• Hate
• Revenge
• Parent/Child Relationships
• Technological advancement
• Ambition
• Pursuit of knowledge
As you read Frankenstein you will encounter many of these themes. You can refer back to these notes as you try to understand these themes.



12) Frankenstein Reader's Notebook

You should create the following headings below the Frankenstein Reader's Notebook entry in your essay: Vocabulary, Personal Reflections, Quotes, and Responding to Literature. Label your first entries under each section "Letters through Chapter III". You will repeat these entries for each of the next three topics.

1. Vocabulary
In your notebook, you will keep track of new words that
you've learned. At the end of every section, you should have a list of at least 10 new words you encountered and their definitions. You can check word definitions with an online dictionary or use one of your own. You can also guess at their definitions based on the clues in the story. At the end of every topic, you should write a brief paragraph summarizing the sections and use at least five of those words in your paragraph.

2. Personal reflection
You will also write down your thoughts/reflections on what you have read. At the end of each section you will answer the following questions:
• What happened? This can be a very brief summary--even a list.
• What questions do I have about what happened?
• What do I think will happen next? What clues do I have to support my thoughts?
• What characters did I meet? How are they related?
• What recurring commentary or theme occurred in the section? (Refer back to your quickwrite notes from earlier if necessary.)
• What broader comment about life or science do you think the author was making? Do I agree?
• What evidence do you have for your thoughts about the
theme? (You can use the quotes section of this notebook for inspiration.)

3. Quotes
In your Reader's Notebook, record quotes from Frankenstein or the Modern Prometheus that strike you as interesting or representative of the book. You should have three to four quotes for each reading assignment.

4. Responding to Literature:
What do Robert Walton and Victor Frankenstein have in common? How are their goals, personalities, and situations similar? How are they different? How does Robert Walton feel about finding a friend?
Why is the poem The Rime of the Ancient Mariner significant to Robert Walton? What effect does the allusion to this poem have on the story? Explain in a brief paragraph.



13) Frankenstein Chapters IV-XVII - Responsibility and Accountability

In your essay, I'd like you to discuss who should be held most responsible for each given situation and the outcome:

1. A passerby tries to revive a person who has stopped breathing with CPR. In the process of performing CPR, the patient suffers a broken rib and a punctured lung and ends up in the hospital for a few weeks. Should the passerby be held responsible for the injury?
2. A young child and a mother are begging for food and money on a street corner. A wealthy couple walks by without offering any assistance and the child dies of starvation. Should the couple assume any responsibility for the child's death?
3. Jane has always been Katie's best friend. One day, Katie gets angry at Jane and spreads terrible rumors about her. Jane is so embarrassed and ashamed of the things Katie has said she drops out of school and does not graduate. What responsibility does Katie have for Jane's depression and lack of success?
4. Will a person who is treated cruelly always respond by treating others with cruelty, or is it possible to return good for ill? Explain.
5. What circumstances justify taking revenge? What are the benefits of revenge? What are the harms?



14) Add to your Frankenstein Reader's Notebook (Frankenstein Chapters IV-XVII)

1. Vocabulary
As you are reading, you are going to be keeping a Reader’s Notebook. In your notebook, you will keep track of new words that you’ve learned. At the end of every section, you should have a list of at least 10 new words you encountered and their definitions. You can check word definitions with an online dictionary or use one of your own. You can also guess at their definitions based on the clues in the story. At the end of every topic, you should write a brief paragraph summarizing the sections and use at least five of those words in your paragraph.

2. Personal reflection
You will also write down your thoughts/reflections on what you have read. At the end of each section you will answer the following questions:
• What happened? This can be a very brief summary--even a list.
• What questions do I have about what happened?
• What do I think will happen next? What clues do I have to support my thoughts?
• What characters did I meet? How are they related?
• What recurring commentary or theme occurred in the section? (Refer back to your quick write notes from earlier if necessary.)
• What broader comment about life or science do you think the author was making? Do I agree?
• What evidence do you have for your thoughts about the theme? (You can use the quotes section of this notebook for inspiration.)

3. Quotes
In your Reader's Notebook, record quotes from Frankenstein or the Modern Prometheus that strike you as interesting or representative of the book. You should have three to four quotes for each reading assignment.

4. Responding to Literature:

• As you're reading, I'd like you to pay close attention to the discussion of people's appearances. Who is described as being beautiful? Who is described as being ugly or unattractive? What happens to the beautiful people? What happens to the less attractive? List three people described as being beautiful and describe their fates. Who is described as being ugly? What is his/her fate?

• What about the monster makes him a sympathetic
character? What makes him less sympathetic? What parts of his personality make him appear human? What parts are inhuman? Answer these questions in a brief paragraph.

• From what you know at the end of this reading, whose fault is what's become of the Monster? Who should be held responsible? What can or should Victor do now to make it right? What should the Monster do?

• List at least three influences of the Romantic movement and three examples of the Gothic elements from the text.


15) Frankenstein Chapter XVIII-End and Connections

Add to the Reader's Notebook section in your essay. I've included the directions for the Reader's Notebook below. Label this topic's entries "Chapter XVIII and Connections".
Directions: As you have been reading, you have been keeping a Reader's Notebook. This will be the last section of your notebook.

1. Vocabulary
In your notebook, you will keep track of new words that you've learned. At the end of every section, you should have a list of at least 10 new words you encountered and their definitions. Write a brief paragraph summarizing the sections and use at least five of those words in your paragraph.

2. Personal reflection
You will also write down your thoughts/reflections on what you have read. At the end of each section you will answer the following questions:
• What happened?
• What questions do I have about what happened?
• What characters did I meet? How are they related? What was the ultimate fate of the characters I have met before?
• What recurring commentary or theme occurred in the
section? (Refer back to your quick write notes from earlier if necessary)
• What broader comment about life or science do you think the author was making? Do I agree? What evidence do you have for your thoughts about the theme?

3. Quotes
In your notebook, record quotes from Frankenstein that strike you as interesting or representative of the book. You should have three to four quotes for each reading assignment.

4. Essay

What is the theme of Frankenstein?

Write a brief essay exploring the theme. You can choose either to use one of the themes discussed earlier or identify one of your own. Your essay should be at least five paragraphs long and should incorporate specific quotes and examples from the text.
Make sure you include analysis about the selections you choose to incorporate in your essay.

5 Responding to Literature

a. How is Frankenstein a "Modern Prometheus"? Explain the allusion in a 1-2 paragraph response.
b. What does Shelley do to show that both the Monster and
Frankenstein are obsessed with revenge? Does either of
them win? Explain your answer.

Choose either C or D to answer in your notebook.

c. At the end of the novel, the Monster sees Frankenstein one last time after he has died. If they had a chance to talk, what do you think they would say to each other? Compose a dialogue of their imagined final meeting. Your dialogue should reflect the feelings of each character about the other and about himself. Be sure to include what you've learned about each character, including motivations, experiences
and emotions revealed throughout the novel. Your dialogue should be at least 10 lines long.

d. Write a brief review of the novel. Did you think it was well written? Did it spark and keep your interest? What are the strengths and weaknesses of the novel? If you have read other horror novels or seen horror films, how does Frankenstein compare to modern horror books or movies? Include in your review what you liked and what you didn't like. Also discuss whether or not you think the book should be recommended to other students. Your review should be at least two paragraphs long.




Excerpt From Essay:
References:


"I…I…I refuse to fuel your happiness by feeling miserable. I know better and I cannot possibly be guilty for everything. I know this because… wait… You're right…it is me who I've been struggling to destroy all of these years. I created you and I shaped your personality through exposing you to the world's evilness."

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Title: Literature

  • Total Pages: 6
  • Words: 1844
  • Bibliography:0
  • Citation Style: MLA
  • Document Type: Research Paper
Essay Instructions: Assginment
Final Paper on an Aspect of Human Experience. Submit a 6-8 page paper discussing a specific aspect of the human experience as it is defined in several works of literature from the list below (fear, love, friendship, hope, desperation, etc.). Highlight the connections across the different readings and discuss these connections in terms of the works? context and how your experiences may have shaped your interpretation. At least three primary works from the list below must be used as resources for this paper. It is suggested that you use one primary source each from the genres of poetry, drama, and fiction.



Fiction (Short Stories):
?Araby,? James Joyce
"The Woman Taken in Adultery," John
"Misery," Anton Chekhov
?A Rose for Emily,? William Faulkner
?The Lottery,? Shirley Jackson
?Before the Law,? Franz Kafka
?The Fall of the House of Usher,? Edgar Allan Poe
?The Man to Send Rain Clouds,? Leslie Marmon Silko
"Everyday Use," Alice Walker
"Boys and Girls," Alice Munro

Poetry:
"Rites of Passage," Sharon Olds
"Daddy," Sylvia Plath
"Come Live with Me and Be My Love," Christopher Marlowe
"The Nymph?s Reply to the Shepherd," Sir Walter Raleigh
"The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock," T. S. EliotT. S. Eliot
"Myth," Muriel Rukeyser
"My Papa?s Waltz," Theodore Roethke
"A Work of Artifice," Marge Piercy
"When I Was One-and-Twenty," A.E. HousmanA.E. Housman
"Child of the Americas," Aurora Levins Morales
"On the Amtrak from Boston to New York City," Sherman Alexie
"Before the Mirror," John Updike
"Mending Wall," Robert Frost
"To His Coy Mistress," Andrew Marvell
"A Poison Tree," William Blake
"Love Song," Joseph Brodsky
"Wishes for sons," Lucille Clifton
"Woman?s Work," Julia Alvarez

Drama:
"A Doll?s House," Henrik Ibsen
"Hamlet," William Shakespeare
"Fences," August Wilson
?The Glass Menagerie,? Tennessee Williams

Fiction:
"The Lesson," Toni Cade Bambara
"El Tonto del Barrio," Jos? Armas
"The Man to Send Rain Clouds," Leslie Marmon Silko
Excerpt From Essay:
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